Parrotfish

I’ve been trying macro photography and using the depth of field to make the subject of my photos stand out more from the background. This photo of a parrotfish shows promising results beyond “blurry fish butt” quality. I’ll definitely use this technique more often in the future, especially for colorful fish with colorful coral in the background.

#photographyfirstworldproblems

Surfing progress!

As a founding member of our surf club, I’ve decided to do what what was long overdue and took my second surfing lesson.

Surfspot, Scheveningen's harbour pier
Surfspot, Scheveningen’s harbour pier

I went to a surfschool in Scheveningen at the North Sea, got in touch with an instructor, and after going over the water situation, currents, swell and technique, we went into the water for a good one and a half hours. There was a good swell, and next to the harbour’s pier, we were mostly out of the wind. After building up some skills, like catching waves and paddling into them, I managed to ride out a few waves, onto the beach. Not over a long distance, but at least I didn’t fall for a few seconds, a few times. Pretty good progress. Next try planned on sunday, weather allowing. It’s still the North Sea, and it’s still winter, so things can get nasty…

The water temperature was 9°C, which seems cold. I wore my 7mm full-length suit, 3mm gloves and a 5mm hood. It didn’t feel cold even in my fingertops after getting out of the water, so even in March, the North Sea is already very manageable.

Surfing was great fun, it’s an interesting break from diving in that it’s much more physically active. In diving, you tend to spend as little energy on anything as possible. That means that if you’re a good diver (and in the right conditions), you actually burn very little energy. That means you’re getting cold much quicker. Bodysurfing, on the other hand means that you’re constantly moving through the swell, swimming, paddling, getting up, falling, so you end up burning a lot of energy. The cold splash of water is really welcome then.

As opposed to diving, there is no buddy system in surfing, so you can go surfing on your own (under the right conditions, of course). That makes it a bit more flexible than diving. It also trains different muscle groups, especially arms and shoulders, so it complements diving well.

Waves are awesome. :)

Plasma Meeting: Web, browsers and app bundles

This year’s Plasma Sprint is kindly being hosted by von Affenfels, a software company in Stuttgart, Germany, focusing on mobile apps. Let me try to give you an idea of what we’re working on this week.

Bundled apps

Welcome, KDE hackers!
Welcome, KDE hackers!
One problem we’re facing in KDE is that for Linux, our most important target platform, we depend on Linux distributors to ship our apps and updates for it. This is problematic on the distro side, since the work on packaging has to be duplicated by many different people, but it’s also a problem for application developers, since it may take weeks, months or until forever until an update becomes available for users. This is a serious problem and puts us far, far behind for example deployment cycles for webapps.

Bundled app technologies such as flatpak, appimage and snap solve this problem by allowing us to create one of these packages and deploy them across a wide range of distributions. That means that we could go as far as shipping apps ourselves and cutting out the distros as middle men. This has a bunch of advantages:

  • Releases and fixes can reach the user much quicker as we don’t have to wait for distros with their own cycles, policies and resources to pick up our updates
  • Users can easily get the lastest version of the software they need, without being bound to what the distro ships
  • Packaging and testing effort is vastly reduced as it has to only be done once, and not for every distro out there
  • Distros with less man-power, who may not be able to package and offer a lot of software can make available many more appliations,…
  • …and at the same time concentrate their efforts on the core of their OS

From a Plasma point of view, we want to concentrate on a single technology, and not three of them. My personal favorite is flatpak, as it is technologically the most advanced, it doesn’t rely on a proprietary and centralized server component. Unless Canonical changes the way they control snaps, flatpak should be the technology KDE concentrates on. This hasn’t been formally decided however, and the jury is still out. I think it’s important to realize that KDE isn’t served by adopting a technology for a process as important as software distribution that could be switched off by a single company. This would pose an unacceptable risk, and it would send the wrong signal to the rest of the Free software community.

How would this look like to the user? I can imagine KDE to ship applications directly. We already build our code on pretty much every commit, we are actually the best candidate to know how to build it properly. We’d integrate this seamlessly in Discover through the KDE store, and users should be able to install our applications very easily, perhaps similarly to openSUSE’s one click install, but based on appstream metadata.

Website work

Hackers hacking.
Hackers hacking.

We started off the meeting by going over and categorizing topics and then dove straight into the first topic: Communication and Design. There’s a new website for Plasma (and the whole of KDE) coming, thanks to the tireless work of Ken Vermette. We went over most of his recent work to review and suggest fixes, but also to get a bit excited about this new public face of Plasma. The website is part of a bigger problem: In KDE, we’re doing lots of excellent work, but we fail to communicate it properly, regularly and in ways and media that reach our target audience. In fact, we haven’t even clearly defined the target audience. This is something we want to tackle in the near future as well, so stay tuned.

But also webbrowsers….

KDE Plasma in 2017
KDE Plasma in 2017

Kai Uwe demo’ed his work on better integration of browsers: Native notifications instead of the out-of-place notifications created by the browser, controls for media player integration between Plasma and the browser (so your album artwork gets shown in the panel’s media controller), acccess to tabs, closing all incognito tabs from Plasma, including individual browser and a few more cool features. Plasma already has most of this functionality, so the bigger part of this has to be in the browser. Kai has implemented the browser side of things as an extension for Chromium (that’s what he uses, Firefox support is also planned), and we’re discussing how we can bring this extension to the attention of the users, possibly preinstalling it so you get the improvements in browser integration without having to spend a thought on it.

On and on…

We only just started our sprint, and there are many more things we’re working on and discussing. The above is my account of some things we discussed so far, but I’m planning to keep you posted.

33C3: Works for me

Rocket Science
Rocket Science
The calm days between christmas and new year are best celebrated with your family (of choice), so I went to Hamburg where the 33rd edition of the Chaos Computer Congress opened the door to 12.000 hackers, civil rights activists, makers and people interested in privacy and computer security. The motto of this congress is “works for me” which is meant as a critical nudge towards developers who stop after technology works for them, while it should work for everyone. A demand for a change in attitude.

33C3's ballroom
33C3’s ballroom

The congress is a huge gathering of people to share information, hack, talk and party, and the past days have been a blast. This congress strikes an excellent balance between high quality talks, interesting hacks and electronics and a laid back atmosphere, all almost around the clock. (Well, the official track stops around 2 a.m., but continues around half past eleven in the morning.) The schedule is really relaxed, which makes it possibly to party at night, and interrupt dancing for a quick presentation about colonizing intergalactic space — done by domain experts.

The conference also has a large unconference part, hacking spaces, and lounge areas, meaning that the setup is somewhere in between a technology conference, a large hack-fest and a techno party. Everything is filled to the brim with electronics and decorated nicely, and after a few days, the outside world simply starts to fade and “congress” becomes the new reality.

No Love for the U.S. Gov

I’ve attended a bunch of sessions on civil rights and cyber warfare, as well as more technical things. One presentation that touched me in particular was the story of Lauri Love, who is accused of stealing data from agencies including Federal Reserve, Nasa and FBI. This talk was presented by a civil rights activist from the Courage foundation, and two hackers from Anonymous and Lulzsec. While Love is a UK citizen, the US is demanding extradition from the UK so they can prosecute him under US law (which is much stricter than the UK’s). This would create a precedent making it much easier for the US to essentially be able to prosecute citizens anywhere under US law.

What kind of technoparty^W congres is this?
What kind of technoparty^W congres is this?
This, combined with the US jail system poses a serious threat to Love. He wouldn’t be the first person to commit suicide under the pressure put on him by the US government agencies, who really seem to be playing hardball here. (Chelsea Manning, the whistleblower behind the videos of the baghdad airstrikes, in which US airforce killed innocent citizens carelessly, among others) who suffered from mental health issues, was put into solitary confinement, instead of receiving health care. Against that background, the UK would send one of their own citizens into a jail that doesn’t even respect basic human rights. On particularly touching moment was when the brother of Aaron Swartz took the microphone and appealed to the people who asked how they could prevent another Aaron, that helping Lauri (and Chelsea) is the way to help out, and that’s where the energy should be put. Very moving.

The media team at this event is recording most of the sessions, so if you have some time to spare, head over to media.ccc.de and get your fix. See you at 34C3!

Ocean Warrior

The Ocean Warrior
The Ocean Warrior

The Ocean Warrior, the newest vessel in Sea Shepherd‘s fleet docked in Amsterdam before beginning its voyage to the Southern Ocean around Antarctica to prevent poachers from killing whales. Sea Shepherd is a marine conservation society that employs direct action to protect marine wildlife. The Ocean Warrior is a 54m custom-built vessel, hosting a crew of 16. It’s very fast, reaching almost 30 knots at top speed. It is powered by 4 3000 horse power engines, and features an open deck at the stern with a hefty water cannon.

Inspecting the bridge
Inspecting the bridge

The Ocean Warrior is an incredibly slick and strictly functional master-piece of ship engineering.  Its solid build makes it a tool suitable for the extreme conditions around Antarctica.

View towards the stern from the bridge
View towards the stern from the bridge
Powerful water cannon to keep poachers at bay
Powerful water cannon to keep poachers at bay

Its unusually high top-speed will give the Sea Shepherd fleet a huge strategic advantage in the vast wideness of the Southern Ocean.

Stern deck
Stern deck

 

Plasma at QtCon

QtCon opening keynote
QtCon opening keynote

QtCon 2016 is a special event: it co-hosts KDE’s Akademy, the Qt Contributor summit, the FSFE summit, the VideoLan dev days and KDAB’s training day into one big conference. As such, the conference is buzzing with developers and Free software people (often both traits combined in one person).

Naturally, the Plasma team is there with agenda’s filled to the brim: We want to tell more people about what Plasma has to offer, answer their questions, listen to their feedback and rope them in to work with us on Plasma. We have also planned a bunch of sessions to discuss important topics, let me give some examples:

  • Release Schedule — Our current schedule was based on the needs of a freshly released “dot oh” version (Plasma 5.0), Plasma 5 is now way more mature. Do we want to adjust our release schedule of 4 major versions a year to that?
  • Convergence — How can we improve integration of touch-friendly UIs in our workflows?
  • What are our biggest quality problems right now, and what are we going to do about it?
  • How do we make Plasma Mobile available on more devices, what are our next milestones?
  • How can we improve the Plasma session start?
  • What’s left to make Plasma on Wayland ready for prime-time?
  • How can we improve performance further?
  • etc.

You see, we’re going to be really busy here. You won’t see results of this next week, but this kind of meeting is important to flesh out our development for the next months and years.

All good
All good? – All good!