Plasma Mobile Roadmap

In the past weeks, we have noticed an increased interest in Plasma Mobile from different sides. Slowly, but surely, hardware vendors have discovered that Plasma Mobile is an entirely different software platform to build products on top of. For people or companies who want to work or invest into Plasma Mobile, it’s always useful to know where upstream is heading, so let me give an overview of what our plans are, what areas of work we’re planning to tackle in the coming months and years, where our focus will be and how it will shift. Let’s talk about Plasma Mobile’s roadmap.

Our development strategy is to build a basic system and platform around our core values first and then extend this. Having a stable base of essentials allows us to focus on an achievable subset first and then extend functionality for more and more possible target groups. It avoids pie-in-the-sky system engineering something that will never be useful and designed for a unicorn market that never existed. Get the basics right first, then take it to the next levels. These levels are:

  1. Prototype (already finished)
  2. Feature Phone
  3. Basic Smartphone
  4. Featured Smartphone

Plasma Mobile Roadmap
Plasma Mobile Roadmap

Let’s look at these steps in detail.

Prototype and Product Vision

The first public release of Plasma Mobile was this prototype. It showed a very basic and incomplete-for-daily-use system on actual, modern smartphone hardware. You could make phone calls, start and manage apps, and manipulate some basic system functionality. It showed a smartphone system based on Plasma could be done, and more importantly, it taught us a lot about where we want to take things on a technical level.
Along with the prototype, we developed a product vision for Plasma Mobile, a direction where we want to take it (emphasis added by yours truly):

“Plasma Mobile aims to become a complete software system for mobile devices. It is designed to give privacy-aware users back the full-control over their information and communication. Plasma Mobile takes a pragmatic approach and is inclusive to 3rd party software, allowing the user to choose which applications and services to use. It provides a seamless experience across multiple devices. Plasma Mobile implements open standards and it is developed in a transparent process that is open for the community to participate in.”

Feature Phone

The feature phone milestone is what we’re working on right now. This involves taking the prototype and fixing all the basic things to turn it into something usable. Usable doesn’t mean “usable for everyone”, but it should at least be workable for a subset of people that only rely on basic features — “simple” things.
Core features should work flawlessly once this milestone is achieved. With core features, we’re thinking along the lines of making phone calls, using the address book, manage hardware functions such as network connectivity, volume, screen, time, language, etc.. Aside from these very core things for a phone, we want to provide decent integration with a webbrowser (or provide our own), app store integration likely using store.kde.org, so you can get apps on and off the device, taking photos, recording videos and watching these media. Finally, we want to settle for an SDK which allows third party developers to build apps to run on Plasma Mobile devices.
Getting this to work is no small feat, but it allows us to receive real-world feedback and provide a stable base for third-party products. It makes Plasma Mobile a viable target for future product development.

Basic Smartphone

The basic smartphone extends the feature set of Plasma Mobile to a wider group of target users. The plan is to add personal information management features, such as reading and sending emails, calendaring and reminders. We also want to add file management capabilities in this milestone, because we think that the user should be able to deal with the data in her phone in the most transparant way, and file management is something that allows users to look into the fabric of their data, and that of the phone itself. Another big topic for the Basic Smartphone milestone is extending the app ecosystem through third-party and original applications to allow the user to do more things with the device.

Featured Smartphone

For the featured smartphone, we want to add more system-level integration features such as deeply integrated private cloud storage and have grown our own ecosystem with more apps and of course games. An often requested feature is support for Android apps. Supporting Android apps could give Plasma Mobile a huge boost in terms of possible target groups, since it allows users to switch away from Android more easily, even when they are requiring a few apps and can’t really live without these. Being able to run Android apps on a Plasma Mobile device can ease the transition considerably and it allows us to capture potential target user groups that rely on proprietary services which Plasma Mobile, at first, cannot serve simply because as a smaller player, it’s not an attractive enough platform to have the likes of WhatsApp develop native clients for.

When it’s ready!?

On purpose, we did not add a specific timeline to this roadmap for two reasons: First, Plasma Mobile is a participative project, if you want to see something done, get involved. We’re not running the show all by ourselves. We want to create an open eco system where people who do the work decide on its direction. This means if you get involved, you can help us shape the future of mobile computing instead of being just a code monkey that does what someone else has decided. Secondly, we don’t want to deliver half-assed software just because we set a timeline. We want to create quality software to build products upon. If you or your company want to ship on a specific date, work with us and we’ll plan together. We won’t make promises when something is ready beforehand, but as an upstream project, we want to ship “when it’s ready”. This “when” depends on all our input and hard work. So don’t sit in your armchairs and wait for someone else to do the heavy lifting, but let’s get cracking!

4 reasons why the librem 5 got funded

Librem 5 Plasma Mobile
Librem 5 Plasma Mobile
In the past days, the campaign to crowd-fund a privacy-focused smartphone built on top of Free software and in collaboration with its community reached its funding goal of 1.5 million US dollars. While many people doubted that the crowdfunding campaign would succeed, it is actually hardly surprising if we look what the librem 5 promises to bring to the table.

1. Unique Privacy Features: Kill-switches and auditable code

Neither Apple nor Android have convincing stories when it comes to privacy. Ultimately, they’re both under the thumbs of a restrictive government, which, to put it mildly doesn’t give a shit about privacy and has created the most intrusive global spying system in the history of mankind. Thanks to the U.S., we now live in the dystopian future of Orwell’s 1984. It’s time to put an end to this with hardware kill switches that cut off power to the radio, microphone and camera, so phones can’t be hacked into anymore to listen in on your conversations, take photos you never know were taken and send them to people you definitely would never voluntarily share them with. All that comes with auditable code, which is something that we as citizens should demand from our government. With a product on the market supplying these features, it becomes very hard for your government to argue that they really need their staff to use iphones or Android devices. We can and we should demand this level of privacy from those who govern us and handle with our data. It’s a matter of trust.
Companies will find this out first, since they’re driven by the same challenges but usually much quicker to adopt technology.

2. Hackable software means choice

The librem 5 will run a mostly standard Debian system with a kernel that you can actually upgrade. The system will be fully hackable, so it will be easy for others to create modified phone systems based on the librem. This is so far unparalleled and brings the freedom the Free software world has long waited for, it will enable friendly competition and collaboration. All this leads to choice for the users.

3. Support promise

Can a small company such as Purism actually guarantee support for a whole mobile software stack for years into the future? Perhaps. The point is, even in case they fail (and I don’t see why they would!), the device isn’t unsupported. With the librem, you’re not locked into a single vendor’s eco system, but you buy into the support from the whole Free software community. This means that there is a very credible support story, as device doesn’t have to come from a single vendor, and the workload is relatively limited in the first place. Debian (which is the base for PureOS) will be maintained anyway, and so will Plasma as tens of millions of users already rely on it. The relatively small part of the code that is unique to Plasma Mobile (and thus isn’t used on the desktop) is not that hard to maintain, so support is manageable, even for a small team of developers. (And if you’re not happy with it, and think it can be done better, you can even take part.)

4. It builds and enables a new ecosystem

The Free software community has long waited for this hackable device. Many developers just love to see a platform they can build software for that follows their goals, that allows development with a proven stack. Moreover, convergence allows users to blur the lines between their devices, and advancing that goal hasn’t been on the agenda with the current duopoly.
The librem 5 will put Matrix on the map as a serious contender for communication. Matrix has rallied quite a bit of momentum to bring more modern mobile-friendly communication, chat and voice to the Free software eco-system.
Overall, I expect the librem 5 to make Free software (not just open-source-licensed, but openly developed Free software) a serious player also on mobile devices. The Free software world needs such a device, and now is the time to create it. With this huge success comes the next big challenge, actually creating the device and software.

The unique selling points of the librem 5 definitely strike a chord with a number of target groups. If you’re doubtful that its first version can fully replace your current smart phone, that may be justified, but don’t forget that there’s a large number of people and organisations that can live with a more limited feature set just fine, given the huge advantages that private communication and knowing-what’s-going-on in your device brings with it.
The librem 5 really brings something very compelling to the table and those are the reasons why it got funded. It is going to be a viable alternative to Android and iOS devices that allows users to enjoy their digital life privately. To switch off tracking, and to sleep comfortably.
Are you convinced this is a good idea? Don’t hesitate to support the campaign and help us reach its stretch goals!

Diving Langedijk

There’s hardly a better way to spend a sunday diving, even in early fall when the weather gets a little colder and rainier. We went to Zeeland, at the Dutch coast, to a divespot named Langedijk for two shallow shore dives. The water was a somewhat brisk 14°C, but our drysuits kept us toasty even through longe dive.

Steurgarnaal
Steurgarnaal
Fluwelen zwemkrab
Fluwelen zwemkrab
Weduweroos
Weduweroos
Pitvis
Pitvis
Zakpijp
Zakpijp
botervis
botervis
Kreeft
Kreeft

Plasma Convergence, technically

A Plasma Phone
A Plasma Phone

In one of my latest blogs, I’ve explained what convergence is, how Plasma benefits from it, and why we consider it a goal for Plasma. This time around, I’ll explain the how, how it works across the stack and how we implemented it. Naturally, this article dives a lot deeper, technically, than my previous one.

Convergence plays a role at different levels of the whole software stack. In this, more technical article, I’ll look at different layers of the software stack, from boot/kernel and middleware to UI controls and overall layout and input methods. After reading this article, you’ll understand how Plasma allows to use the same software on a range of devices, which parts are different, and where code sharing makes sense, and thus happens.
Keep in mind that Convergence, at least for Plasma, doesn’t mean that we ship a lowest-common denominator UI so it “kind of” runs on all things computer, but that it provides a toolbox to build customized UIs that allow taking advantage of specific characteristics of a given target device.

Lower Levels and Packaging

Plasma -- same code, different devices
Plasma — same code, different devices

One aspect of convergence that is of course the deployment side. This doesn’t just include the kernel and bootloader, which needs to be compiled differently for ARM devices and for x86 devices. The rest of the stack is by now largely the same. We are now using the same set of packages and CI for both, mobile and desktop builds, in fact most packages are the same, and the difference between a device set up for mobile use cases and desktop is the selection of packages, and what gets started by default. Everything is integrated to a very large degree, lots of work is shared which means timely updates across the device spectrum we serve.

Controls

Plasma Mobile
Plasma Mobile

When it comes to user interface controls, such as buttons, text fields, etc., convergence is mostly a solved problem. Touch input is possible, Qt nowadays even ships a virtual keyboard (which Plasma uses for example for password input in the lock-screen), and buttons react to touch events as well. QtQuick-based user interfaces often work quite well with both, keyboard/mouse and touch input, in fact touch is one of the design goals of QtQuick.

Not everything is perfect yet, however, especially text selection and keyboard control of QtQuick-based UIs often still requires custom-code, meaning it needs more development and maintainance time to get right. QWidget-based UIs are still a bit ahead of the game here, though often the benefits of also being able to deploy an app on touch devices (such as many Android devices out there!) make QtQuick an attractive technology to use. We see more and more QtQuick-based applications, as this technology matures also for desktop use-cases.

Widgets

Convergent Plasma Widgets
Convergent Plasma Widgets

Plasma is made of widgets. Even in a standard Plasma desktop, everything is a widget: The menu in the bottom left is a widget, the task manager is, the system tray is a widget, and there are widgets inside the system tray for notifications, battery, sound, network, etc.. Plasma is widgets.
These widgets can be used on any device of course, but it doesn’t always make sense. Some of these widgets are very specific for desktops. The task-manager (that thing you use to switch windows, which is usually located in center of the bottom panel) doesn’t really make sense on a mobile device. For a mobile device, which needs larger areas to touch, something more aking to a full-screen window switcher is useful (and in fact what we use for Plasma Mobile). Other widgets, such as the network connections widget or battery and brightness widgets are perfectly suitable also for mobile devices. Plasma’s architecture allows us to re-use the components that need no or just little changes and use them across devices. That means we can concentrate on the missing bits for each device, and that in turn means we can deliver a feature-rich and consistent UI across devices much easier, while making sure the specific characteristics of a given form-factor are used to their fullest extent.
Again, by sharing the components that make sense to share, we can deliver higher quality features for a given devices with less effort, and thus quicker.

Shell and Look & Feel

Look & Feel setup for Plasma
Look & Feel setup for Plasma

Plasma can dynamically load different so-called shell packages. The shell package defines the overall layout of the workspace environment. On the desktop, it says that there’s a fullscreen wallpaper background, with a folderview, a panel at the bottom and the widgets which are loaded into that panel: application launcher, task-manager, system tray and clock for example.
The shell package is different for each device, as this defines the overall workflow, which is highly dependent on the type of device.

To take differences between devices even further, Plasma has the concept of “Look and Feel” packages, which allow further specilialization how a device, well, looks and feels. There’s the widget style and the wallpaper of course. The Look and feel package also defines interaction patterns, such as if a settings interface should use “instant apply” when a setting is changed, or if it should present an “Apply and Okay” button for the user to save settings. Mobile devices typically use instant apply, while desktop interfaces (at least Plasma’s) use the “Apply and Okay” concept throughout. For Plasma UIs, this can be changed dynamically. Plasma’s Look and Feel features is not just useful in the convergence aspect, it allows also for example to switch between a traditional default Plasma setup and a workspace that closely resembles Unity. These “Look and Feel” packages are available through the KDE store, so they’re easy to install and share. There’s even a cool tool that allows you to create your own Look and Feel packages, very much like themes.

Apps

Subsurface Mobile, Linux, Android and iOS from the same code-base
Subsurface Mobile, Linux, Android and iOS from the same code-base

Finally, at application level, we see more and more convergent applications. Kirigami, a high-level toolkit that supplied components for consistent, touch- and keyboard/mouse-friendly application nagivation and layout makes it very easy to create applications with responsive UIs that adapt well to screen size and density and that show flexibility in their input methods. This doesn’t just work between Laptops and phones, but also allows to create one app that works equally well on desktops, laptops, phones and tablets.
Kirigami complements Plasma’s convergence feature on application side, and we recommend it for most newly developed apps. With Qt and QtQuick being a viable target for Android devices, it increases the possible target audience by a very large degree. As an example, Subsurface Mobile, an application for scuba divers, uses Kirigami and works on Linux desktops, Android and iOS, all from the same code-base.

Make it happen…

If you like the idea of convergence, why not join KDE and help us work on Plasma? Perhaps you’d love to see Plasma on a mobile phone? In that case, consider backing the crowdfunding campaign for the librem5 so we can build a convergent phone!

Energy-Saving Plasma

Energy consumption of an idle Plasma desktop
Energy consumption of an idle Plasma desktop
After a series of horrible fuckups (and I’m not using this word lightly here) by Lenovo, they’ve finally replaced my laptop with a 2nd gen X1 Yoga. I’ve finished building Plasma from git (which I need for development work) and thought to give powertop a whirl to check how we’re doing in terms of battery life. I’m very pleased with the results: An idle Plasma Desktop doesn’t wake up the CPU, which is something we worked on avoiding for years. Furthermore, idling, I get a battery drain rate of less than 4 watt, which is pretty exceptional. Bottom line: Our work hasn’t been in vain and shows that Plasma is pretty well optimized to get the most out of your battery. This is especially interesting for Plasma Mobile of course, but benefits laptop users as well. It’s a nice example how our work on convergence benefits all users. And polar bears.

Privacy Software

What are you looking at?
What are you looking at?

As a means to give our work direction and a clearer purpose, KDE is currently in the process of soul-searching. Here’s my proposal of what we should concentrate and focus on in the coming years. I’d welcome any feedback from the community to make this proposal better, and rally up more support from the community, and others interested.

So here’s the Big, hairy, audacious goal that — in my opinion — KDE should focus on, and should adapt its strategy for:

“In 5 years, KDE software enables and promotes privacy”

Privacy is the new challenge for Free Software. KDE is in a unique position to offer users a complete software environment that helps them to protect their privacy. KDE, being community-driven and user-focused, has the opportunity to put privacy on top of the agenda, arguably, being in this position, KDE has the obligation to do this, in the interest of the users.

The effect is expected to be two-fold:

  • Offer users the tools to protect privacy and to lead a private and safe digital life without compromising their identity, exposing their habits and communications
  • Setting a high standard and example for others to follow, define the state of the art of privacy protection in the age of big data and force others to follow suit, thereby increasing pressure on the whole industry and eco-system to protect users’ privacy better

Leaking user data, allowing users to be tracked, collecting their most private information in databases across the world means that users lose control of their identity and what parts they want others to know, and what they want to keep for themselves. Worse, collecting data in so many places, often commercially, but also by governments means that the user has little way of knowing what is known about him or her, let alone being able to determine who should be able to control what. Data being persistently collected means that not only today's security measures and policies are relevant, but also the future's. This poses multiple great risks.

KDE adds a 5th Freedom to the 5 principal software Freedoms:

The freedom to decide which data is sent to which service”.

Personal Risks for Users

Orwell's 1984 is not an instruction manual
Orwell’s 1984 is not an instruction manual

Risks that individual users run are, among others:

  • The more data that is collected, the bigger the risk of Identity Theft becomes
  • More collected data means that decisions will be made for the user based on skewed or incomplete information (imagine insurance policies)
  • Collected data may end up in the hands of oppressive regimes, posing risks to the user when travelling, or even at home
  • Blackmail
  • User's most private secrets may end up in the wrong hands

Socio-economic Effects

Socio-economic effects that effect how society, national and international communities work, are:

  • Free speech is compromised
  • Journalists need tools to communicate secretly, lacking that, freedom and independence of press cannot be guaranteed
  • Trade-secrets cannot be kept, free markets cannot function without tools protecting privacy
  • Sovereignty of nations cannot be guaranteed
  • Cyber-attacks may lead to shift in power

What it will take?

TL;DR:

  • Security
  • Privacy-respecting defaults
  • Offering the right tools in the first place

Security

We can only guarantee privacy if we also value security.
Possible approaches:

  • Functioning code-review
  • Quick turn-around times for software updates, especially security fixes
  • Prefer to use encrypted communication where possible, prefer HTTPS over HTTP where possible, avoid unencrypted connections
  • Storing sensitive information only in an encrypted way
  • Moving away from inherently insecure technologies, i.e. default to Wayland instead of X11
  • Avoiding single points of failure and centralized control

Privacy-Respecting Defaults

KDE software supporting this goal should:

  • Only collect and send data when necessary and clear and sensible from within the context. No hidden telemetry sending user stats, not HTTP connections downloading content, no search queries to online services without the users explicit consent (or where it's entirely clear from the context, e.g. web browsers, software updater, etc.).
  • Use anonymity where it is possible, for example by using Tor connections for things like weather updates that don't require user identification
  • No collection of privacy-relevant data without clear purpose.
  • Conservative defaults: a user should not have to make changes to the software configuration to avoid leaking data. Secure and private by default. (Software may be configured to be more leaky if that benefits the user, but the risk to that should be clear, either from context or explicitely stated.)
  • Use clear and consistent UI and design language around network-related options

Offering the Right Tools

KDE needs to make an effort to provide a comprehensive set of tools for most users' needs, for example:

  • An email client allowing encrypted communication
  • Chat and instant messenging with state-of-the art protocol security
  • A webbrowser (self-provided) that has private default settings
  • File storage and groupware solutions
  • Other tools that allow offline operation and independence from popular cloud services
  • Support for online services that can be operated as private instance, not depending on a 3rd party provider
  • State-of-the-art support and integration for services like Tor, Matrix, Zeronet, etc.

Others

  • KDE e.V. allows anonymous donations via bitcoin (or other crypto currencies)
  • Adaption of blockchain where useful

How we know we succeeded

Static and runtime analysis tools:

KDE software can be audited for compliance with common, security related standards, such as:

  • NIST Cybersecurity Framework (NIST CSF)
  • ISO 15408
  • RFC2196
  • Cyber Essentials (UK Government Standard)
  • … etc.

"Soft" criteria include:

  • Press and 3rd party refer to KDE as carrying the gold-standard for such software
  • Journalists prefer KDE software for their work
  • The NSA hates KDE
  • The CCC loves KDE ♥

The full proposal has a little more details and pointers (and may still be updated, it’s not final yet), but I’d like to keep it at this for my weblog, and also add a note here: Coincidentally, shortly after starting the work on this proposal, KDE’s Plasma team was contacted by Purism who are building a privacy-focused phone. I was immediately excited since I think privacy is more or less an extension of the core values of Free software and the librem5 could provide a really valuable target for KDE’s privacy efforts, I see a fantastic degree of synergy there.

Plasma Mobile and Convergence

Convergence, or the ability the serve different form factors from the same code base, is an often discussed concept. Convergence is at the heart of Plasma‘s design philosophy, but what does this actually mean to how apps are developed? What’s in it for the user? Let’s have a look!

Plasma -- same code, different devices
Plasma — same code, different devices

First, let’s have a look at different angles of “Convergence”. It can actually mean different things, and there is overlap between these. Depending on who you ask, convergence could mean any of the following:

  • Being able to plug a monitor, keyboard and mouse into smartphone and use it as a full-fledged desktop replacement
  • Develop an application that works on a phone as well as on a desktop
  • Create different device user interfaces from the same code base

Convergence, in the broadest sense, has been one of the design goals of Plasma when we started creating it. When we work on Plasma, we ultimately expect components to run on a wide variety of target devices, we refer to that concept as the device spectrum.

Alex, one of Plasma’s designers has created a visual concept for a convergent user interface, that gives an impression how a fully convergent Plasma could look like to the user:

Input Methods and Screen Characteristics

Technically, there are a few aspects of convergence, the most important being: input methods, for example mouse, keyboard, touchscreens or combinations of those, and screen size (both physical dimensions, portrait vs. landscape layout and pixel density).

Touchscreen support is one aspect when it comes to run KDE software on a mobile device or within Plasma Mobile. Touchscreens are not specific to phones any more however, so making an app, or a Plasma component ready for touchscreen usage also benefits people who run Plasma on their convertible laptops, for example. Another big factor is that the app needs to work well on the screen of a smartphone, this means support for high dpi screens as well as a layout that presents the necessary controls in a way that is functional, attractive and user-friendly. With the Kirigami toolkit, which builds on top of QtQuick, we develop apps that work well on both target devices. From a more general point of view, KDE has always developed apps in a cross- platform way, so portability to other platforms is very much at the heart of our codebase.

The Kirigami toolkit, which offers a set of high-level application flow-controls for QtQuick applications achieves exactly that: it allows to built responsive apps that adapt to screen characteristics and input method.

(As an aside, there’s the case for Kirigami also supporting Android. Developing an app specifically for usage in Plasma may be easier, but it is also limiting its reach. Imagine an app running fine on your laptop, but also on your smartphone, be it Android or drive by Plasma Mobile (in the future). That would totally rock, and it would mean a target audience in the billions, not millions. Conversely, providing the technology to create such apps decreases the relative investment compared to the target audience, making technologies such as QtQuick and Kirigami an excellent choice for developers that want to maximize their target audience.)

Plasma Mobile vs. Plasma Desktop

Plasma Mobile is being developed in tandem with the popular Plasma desktop, in fact it shares more then 90% of the code with it. This means that work done on either of the two, mobile and desktop often benefits the other, and that there’s a large degree of compatibility between the two. The result is a system that feels the same across different devices, but makes use of the special capabilities of a given device, and supports different ways of using the software. On the development side, this means huge gains in terms of productivity and quality: A wider set of usage scenarios and having the code running on more machines means that it gets more real-world testing and bugs get shaken out quicker.

Who cares, anyway?

Whether or not convergence is something that users want, I think so. It takes a learning curve for users, and I think advancements in technology to bring this to the market, you need rather powerful hardware, the right connectors, and the right hardware components, so it’s not an easy end-goal. The path to convergence already bears huge benefits, as it means more efficient development, more consistency across different form factors and higher quality code.

Whether or not users care is only relevant to a certain point. Arguably, the biggest benefit of convergence lies in the efficiency of the development process, especially when multiple devices are involved. It doesn’t actually matter all that much if users are going to plug their mouse and keyboard into a phone and use it as a desktop device. Already today, users expect touchscreen to just work, even on laptops, users already expect the convertible being usable when the keyboard is flipped away or unplugged, users already expect to plug a 4K into their 1024×768 resolution laptop and the UI neither becoming unreadable or comically large.

In short: There really is no way around a large degree of convergence in Plasma (and similar products).

The Evolution of Plasma Mobile

Plasma Mobile
Plasma Mobile

Back around 2006, when the Plasma project was started by Aaron Seigo and a group of brave hackers (among which, yours truly) we wanted to create a user interface that is future-proof. We didn’t want to create something that would only run on desktop devices (or laptops), but a code-base that grows with us into whatever the future would bring. Mobile devices were already getting more powerful, but would usually run entirely different software than desktop devices. We wondered why. The Linux kernel served as a wonderful example. Linux runs on a wide range of devices, from super computers to embedded systems, you would set it up for the target system and it would run largely without code changes. Linux architecture is in fact convergent. Could we do something similar at the user interface level?

Plasma Netbook

In 2007, Asus introduced the Eee PC, a small, inexpensive laptop. Netbooks proved to be all the rage at that point, so around 2009, we created Plasma Netbook, proving for the first time that we could actually serve different device user interfaces from the same code-base. There was a decent amount of code-sharing, but Plasma Netbook also helped us identifying areas in which we wanted to do better.

Plasma Mobile (I)

Come 2010, we got our hands on an N900 by Nokia, running Maemo, a mobile version of Linux. Within a week, during a sprint, we worked on a proof-of-concept mobile interface of Plasma:

Well, Nokia-as-we-knew-it is dead now, and Plasma never materialized on Nokia devices.

Plasma Active

Plasma Active was built as a successor to the early prototypes, and our first attempt at creating something for end-users. Conceived in 2011, the idea was not just to produce a simple Plasma user interface for a tablet device, but also deliver on a range of novel ideas for interaction with the device, closely related to the semantic desktop. Interlinked documents, contacts, sharing built right into the core, not just a “dumb” platform to run apps on, but a holistic system that allows users to manage their digital life on the fly. While Plasma Active had great promise and a lot of innovative potential, it never materialized for end-users in part due to lack of interest from both, the KDE community itself, but also from people on the outside. This doesn’t mean that the work put into it was lost, but thanks to a convergent code-base, many improvements made primarily with Plasma Active in mind have improved Plasma for all its users and continue to do so today. In many ways, Active proved valuable as a playground, as a clean slate where we want to take the technology, and how we can improve our developemnt process. It’s not a surprise that Plasma 5 today is developed in a process very similar to how we approached Plasma Active back then.

Plasma Mobile (II)

Learning from the Plasma Active project, in 2015 we regrouped and started to build a rather simple smartphone user interface, along with a reference software stack that would allow us not only to develop Plasma Mobile further, but to allow us to run on a growing number of devices. Plasma Mobile (II)’s goal wasn’t to get the most innovative of interfaces out, but to create a bread-and-butter platform, a base to develop applications on. From a technology point of view, Plasma is actually very small. It shares approximately 95% of the code with its desktop companion, widgets, and increasingly applications are interchangeable between the two.

Plasma Mobile (in any shape or form) has never been this close to actually making it into the hands and pockets of end users. A collaboration project with Purism, a company bringing privacy and software freedom to end-users, we may create the first Plasma phone for end users and have it on the market as soon as januari 2019. If you want to support this project, the crowdfunding campaign has just passed the 40% mark, and you can be part of it — either by joining the development crew, or by pre-ordering a device and thereby funding the development.

Help us create a privacy-focused Free software smartphone!

The news is out! KDE and Purism are working together on a Free software smartphone featuring Plasma Mobile. Purism is running a crowdfunding campaign right now, and if that succeeds, with the help of KDE, the plan is to deliver a smartphone based on Plasma Mobile in January 2019.

Why do I care?

Data collection and evesdropping has become a very common problem. Not only governments (friendly and less-friendly) are spying on us, collecting information about our private lives, also companies are doing so. There is a lot of data about the average user stored in databases around the world that not only allows them to impersonate you, but also to steal from you, to kidnap your data, and to make your life a living hell. There is hardly any effective control how this data is secured, and the more data is out there, the more interesting a target it is to criminals. Do you trust random individuals with your most private information? You probably don’t, and this is why you should care.

Protect your data

Mockup of a Plasma Mobile based phone
Mockup of a Plasma Mobile based phone
The only way to re-gain control before bad things happen is to make sure as little data as possible gets collected. Yet, most electronic products out there do the exact opposite. Worse, the market for smartphones is a duopoly of two companies, neither of which has as a goal the protection of its users. It’s just different flavors of bad.

There’s a hidden price to the cheap services of the Googles and Facebooks of this world, and that is collection of data, which is then sold to third parties. Hardly any user is aware of the problems surrounding that.

KDE has set out to provide users an alternative. Plasma Mobile was created to give users a choice to regain control. We’re building an operating system, transparently, based on the values of Free software and we build it for users to take back control.

Purism and KDE

In the past week, we’ve worked with Purism, a Social Purpose Corporation devoted to bringing security, privacy, software freedom, and digital independence to everyone’s personal computing experience, to create a mobile phone that allows users to regain control.
Purism has started a crowdfunding campaign to collect the funds to make the dream of a security and privacy focused phone.

Invest in your future

By supporting this campaign, you can invest not only into your own future, become an early adopter of the first wave of privacy-protecting personal communication devices, but also to proof that there is a market for products that act in the best interest of the users.

Support the crowdfunding campaign, and help us protect you.

Interview on hostingadvice.com

How KDE's Open Source community has built reliable, monopoly-free computing for 20+ years
How KDE’s Open Source community has built reliable, monopoly-free computing for 20+ years
A few days ago, Hostingadvice.com’s lovely Alexandra Leslie interviewed me about my work in KDE. This interview has just been published on their site. The resulting article gives an excellent overview over what and why KDE is and does, along with some insights and personal stories from my own history in the Free software world.

At the time, Sebastian was only a student and was shocked that his work could have such a huge impact on so many people. That’s when he became dedicated to helping further KDE’s mission to foster a community of experts committed to experimentation and the development of software applications that optimize the way we work, communicate, and interact in the digital space.

“With enough determination, you can really make a difference in the world,” Sebastian said. “The more I realized this, the more I knew KDE was the right place to do it.”