Plasma Convergence, technically

A Plasma Phone
A Plasma Phone

In one of my latest blogs, I’ve explained what convergence is, how Plasma benefits from it, and why we consider it a goal for Plasma. This time around, I’ll explain the how, how it works across the stack and how we implemented it. Naturally, this article dives a lot deeper, technically, than my previous one.

Convergence plays a role at different levels of the whole software stack. In this, more technical article, I’ll look at different layers of the software stack, from boot/kernel and middleware to UI controls and overall layout and input methods. After reading this article, you’ll understand how Plasma allows to use the same software on a range of devices, which parts are different, and where code sharing makes sense, and thus happens.
Keep in mind that Convergence, at least for Plasma, doesn’t mean that we ship a lowest-common denominator UI so it “kind of” runs on all things computer, but that it provides a toolbox to build customized UIs that allow taking advantage of specific characteristics of a given target device.

Lower Levels and Packaging

Plasma -- same code, different devices
Plasma — same code, different devices

One aspect of convergence that is of course the deployment side. This doesn’t just include the kernel and bootloader, which needs to be compiled differently for ARM devices and for x86 devices. The rest of the stack is by now largely the same. We are now using the same set of packages and CI for both, mobile and desktop builds, in fact most packages are the same, and the difference between a device set up for mobile use cases and desktop is the selection of packages, and what gets started by default. Everything is integrated to a very large degree, lots of work is shared which means timely updates across the device spectrum we serve.

Controls

Plasma Mobile
Plasma Mobile

When it comes to user interface controls, such as buttons, text fields, etc., convergence is mostly a solved problem. Touch input is possible, Qt nowadays even ships a virtual keyboard (which Plasma uses for example for password input in the lock-screen), and buttons react to touch events as well. QtQuick-based user interfaces often work quite well with both, keyboard/mouse and touch input, in fact touch is one of the design goals of QtQuick.

Not everything is perfect yet, however, especially text selection and keyboard control of QtQuick-based UIs often still requires custom-code, meaning it needs more development and maintainance time to get right. QWidget-based UIs are still a bit ahead of the game here, though often the benefits of also being able to deploy an app on touch devices (such as many Android devices out there!) make QtQuick an attractive technology to use. We see more and more QtQuick-based applications, as this technology matures also for desktop use-cases.

Widgets

Convergent Plasma Widgets
Convergent Plasma Widgets

Plasma is made of widgets. Even in a standard Plasma desktop, everything is a widget: The menu in the bottom left is a widget, the task manager is, the system tray is a widget, and there are widgets inside the system tray for notifications, battery, sound, network, etc.. Plasma is widgets.
These widgets can be used on any device of course, but it doesn’t always make sense. Some of these widgets are very specific for desktops. The task-manager (that thing you use to switch windows, which is usually located in center of the bottom panel) doesn’t really make sense on a mobile device. For a mobile device, which needs larger areas to touch, something more aking to a full-screen window switcher is useful (and in fact what we use for Plasma Mobile). Other widgets, such as the network connections widget or battery and brightness widgets are perfectly suitable also for mobile devices. Plasma’s architecture allows us to re-use the components that need no or just little changes and use them across devices. That means we can concentrate on the missing bits for each device, and that in turn means we can deliver a feature-rich and consistent UI across devices much easier, while making sure the specific characteristics of a given form-factor are used to their fullest extent.
Again, by sharing the components that make sense to share, we can deliver higher quality features for a given devices with less effort, and thus quicker.

Shell and Look & Feel

Look & Feel setup for Plasma
Look & Feel setup for Plasma

Plasma can dynamically load different so-called shell packages. The shell package defines the overall layout of the workspace environment. On the desktop, it says that there’s a fullscreen wallpaper background, with a folderview, a panel at the bottom and the widgets which are loaded into that panel: application launcher, task-manager, system tray and clock for example.
The shell package is different for each device, as this defines the overall workflow, which is highly dependent on the type of device.

To take differences between devices even further, Plasma has the concept of “Look and Feel” packages, which allow further specilialization how a device, well, looks and feels. There’s the widget style and the wallpaper of course. The Look and feel package also defines interaction patterns, such as if a settings interface should use “instant apply” when a setting is changed, or if it should present an “Apply and Okay” button for the user to save settings. Mobile devices typically use instant apply, while desktop interfaces (at least Plasma’s) use the “Apply and Okay” concept throughout. For Plasma UIs, this can be changed dynamically. Plasma’s Look and Feel features is not just useful in the convergence aspect, it allows also for example to switch between a traditional default Plasma setup and a workspace that closely resembles Unity. These “Look and Feel” packages are available through the KDE store, so they’re easy to install and share. There’s even a cool tool that allows you to create your own Look and Feel packages, very much like themes.

Apps

Subsurface Mobile, Linux, Android and iOS from the same code-base
Subsurface Mobile, Linux, Android and iOS from the same code-base

Finally, at application level, we see more and more convergent applications. Kirigami, a high-level toolkit that supplied components for consistent, touch- and keyboard/mouse-friendly application nagivation and layout makes it very easy to create applications with responsive UIs that adapt well to screen size and density and that show flexibility in their input methods. This doesn’t just work between Laptops and phones, but also allows to create one app that works equally well on desktops, laptops, phones and tablets.
Kirigami complements Plasma’s convergence feature on application side, and we recommend it for most newly developed apps. With Qt and QtQuick being a viable target for Android devices, it increases the possible target audience by a very large degree. As an example, Subsurface Mobile, an application for scuba divers, uses Kirigami and works on Linux desktops, Android and iOS, all from the same code-base.

Make it happen…

If you like the idea of convergence, why not join KDE and help us work on Plasma? Perhaps you’d love to see Plasma on a mobile phone? In that case, consider backing the crowdfunding campaign for the librem5 so we can build a convergent phone!

Plasma Mobile and Convergence

Convergence, or the ability the serve different form factors from the same code base, is an often discussed concept. Convergence is at the heart of Plasma‘s design philosophy, but what does this actually mean to how apps are developed? What’s in it for the user? Let’s have a look!

Plasma -- same code, different devices
Plasma — same code, different devices

First, let’s have a look at different angles of “Convergence”. It can actually mean different things, and there is overlap between these. Depending on who you ask, convergence could mean any of the following:

  • Being able to plug a monitor, keyboard and mouse into smartphone and use it as a full-fledged desktop replacement
  • Develop an application that works on a phone as well as on a desktop
  • Create different device user interfaces from the same code base

Convergence, in the broadest sense, has been one of the design goals of Plasma when we started creating it. When we work on Plasma, we ultimately expect components to run on a wide variety of target devices, we refer to that concept as the device spectrum.

Alex, one of Plasma’s designers has created a visual concept for a convergent user interface, that gives an impression how a fully convergent Plasma could look like to the user:

Input Methods and Screen Characteristics

Technically, there are a few aspects of convergence, the most important being: input methods, for example mouse, keyboard, touchscreens or combinations of those, and screen size (both physical dimensions, portrait vs. landscape layout and pixel density).

Touchscreen support is one aspect when it comes to run KDE software on a mobile device or within Plasma Mobile. Touchscreens are not specific to phones any more however, so making an app, or a Plasma component ready for touchscreen usage also benefits people who run Plasma on their convertible laptops, for example. Another big factor is that the app needs to work well on the screen of a smartphone, this means support for high dpi screens as well as a layout that presents the necessary controls in a way that is functional, attractive and user-friendly. With the Kirigami toolkit, which builds on top of QtQuick, we develop apps that work well on both target devices. From a more general point of view, KDE has always developed apps in a cross- platform way, so portability to other platforms is very much at the heart of our codebase.

The Kirigami toolkit, which offers a set of high-level application flow-controls for QtQuick applications achieves exactly that: it allows to built responsive apps that adapt to screen characteristics and input method.

(As an aside, there’s the case for Kirigami also supporting Android. Developing an app specifically for usage in Plasma may be easier, but it is also limiting its reach. Imagine an app running fine on your laptop, but also on your smartphone, be it Android or drive by Plasma Mobile (in the future). That would totally rock, and it would mean a target audience in the billions, not millions. Conversely, providing the technology to create such apps decreases the relative investment compared to the target audience, making technologies such as QtQuick and Kirigami an excellent choice for developers that want to maximize their target audience.)

Plasma Mobile vs. Plasma Desktop

Plasma Mobile is being developed in tandem with the popular Plasma desktop, in fact it shares more then 90% of the code with it. This means that work done on either of the two, mobile and desktop often benefits the other, and that there’s a large degree of compatibility between the two. The result is a system that feels the same across different devices, but makes use of the special capabilities of a given device, and supports different ways of using the software. On the development side, this means huge gains in terms of productivity and quality: A wider set of usage scenarios and having the code running on more machines means that it gets more real-world testing and bugs get shaken out quicker.

Who cares, anyway?

Whether or not convergence is something that users want, I think so. It takes a learning curve for users, and I think advancements in technology to bring this to the market, you need rather powerful hardware, the right connectors, and the right hardware components, so it’s not an easy end-goal. The path to convergence already bears huge benefits, as it means more efficient development, more consistency across different form factors and higher quality code.

Whether or not users care is only relevant to a certain point. Arguably, the biggest benefit of convergence lies in the efficiency of the development process, especially when multiple devices are involved. It doesn’t actually matter all that much if users are going to plug their mouse and keyboard into a phone and use it as a desktop device. Already today, users expect touchscreen to just work, even on laptops, users already expect the convertible being usable when the keyboard is flipped away or unplugged, users already expect to plug a 4K into their 1024×768 resolution laptop and the UI neither becoming unreadable or comically large.

In short: There really is no way around a large degree of convergence in Plasma (and similar products).

The Evolution of Plasma Mobile

Plasma Mobile
Plasma Mobile

Back around 2006, when the Plasma project was started by Aaron Seigo and a group of brave hackers (among which, yours truly) we wanted to create a user interface that is future-proof. We didn’t want to create something that would only run on desktop devices (or laptops), but a code-base that grows with us into whatever the future would bring. Mobile devices were already getting more powerful, but would usually run entirely different software than desktop devices. We wondered why. The Linux kernel served as a wonderful example. Linux runs on a wide range of devices, from super computers to embedded systems, you would set it up for the target system and it would run largely without code changes. Linux architecture is in fact convergent. Could we do something similar at the user interface level?

Plasma Netbook

In 2007, Asus introduced the Eee PC, a small, inexpensive laptop. Netbooks proved to be all the rage at that point, so around 2009, we created Plasma Netbook, proving for the first time that we could actually serve different device user interfaces from the same code-base. There was a decent amount of code-sharing, but Plasma Netbook also helped us identifying areas in which we wanted to do better.

Plasma Mobile (I)

Come 2010, we got our hands on an N900 by Nokia, running Maemo, a mobile version of Linux. Within a week, during a sprint, we worked on a proof-of-concept mobile interface of Plasma:

Well, Nokia-as-we-knew-it is dead now, and Plasma never materialized on Nokia devices.

Plasma Active

Plasma Active was built as a successor to the early prototypes, and our first attempt at creating something for end-users. Conceived in 2011, the idea was not just to produce a simple Plasma user interface for a tablet device, but also deliver on a range of novel ideas for interaction with the device, closely related to the semantic desktop. Interlinked documents, contacts, sharing built right into the core, not just a “dumb” platform to run apps on, but a holistic system that allows users to manage their digital life on the fly. While Plasma Active had great promise and a lot of innovative potential, it never materialized for end-users in part due to lack of interest from both, the KDE community itself, but also from people on the outside. This doesn’t mean that the work put into it was lost, but thanks to a convergent code-base, many improvements made primarily with Plasma Active in mind have improved Plasma for all its users and continue to do so today. In many ways, Active proved valuable as a playground, as a clean slate where we want to take the technology, and how we can improve our developemnt process. It’s not a surprise that Plasma 5 today is developed in a process very similar to how we approached Plasma Active back then.

Plasma Mobile (II)

Learning from the Plasma Active project, in 2015 we regrouped and started to build a rather simple smartphone user interface, along with a reference software stack that would allow us not only to develop Plasma Mobile further, but to allow us to run on a growing number of devices. Plasma Mobile (II)’s goal wasn’t to get the most innovative of interfaces out, but to create a bread-and-butter platform, a base to develop applications on. From a technology point of view, Plasma is actually very small. It shares approximately 95% of the code with its desktop companion, widgets, and increasingly applications are interchangeable between the two.

Plasma Mobile (in any shape or form) has never been this close to actually making it into the hands and pockets of end users. A collaboration project with Purism, a company bringing privacy and software freedom to end-users, we may create the first Plasma phone for end users and have it on the market as soon as januari 2019. If you want to support this project, the crowdfunding campaign has just passed the 40% mark, and you can be part of it — either by joining the development crew, or by pre-ordering a device and thereby funding the development.

Interview on hostingadvice.com

How KDE's Open Source community has built reliable, monopoly-free computing for 20+ years
How KDE’s Open Source community has built reliable, monopoly-free computing for 20+ years
A few days ago, Hostingadvice.com’s lovely Alexandra Leslie interviewed me about my work in KDE. This interview has just been published on their site. The resulting article gives an excellent overview over what and why KDE is and does, along with some insights and personal stories from my own history in the Free software world.

At the time, Sebastian was only a student and was shocked that his work could have such a huge impact on so many people. That’s when he became dedicated to helping further KDE’s mission to foster a community of experts committed to experimentation and the development of software applications that optimize the way we work, communicate, and interact in the digital space.

“With enough determination, you can really make a difference in the world,” Sebastian said. “The more I realized this, the more I knew KDE was the right place to do it.”

Plasma’s Vision

Plasma -- Durable, Usable, Elegant.
Plasma — Durable, Usable, Elegant.
Over the past weeks, we (KDE’s Plasma team) have distilled the reasons why we do what we do, and what we want to achieve into a vision statement. In this article, I’d like to present Plasma’s vision and explain a bit what is behind it. Let’s start with the statement itself, though:

Plasma is a cross-device work environment by the KDE Community where trust is put on the user’s capacity to best define her own workflow and preferences.

Plasma is simple by default, a clean work area for real-world usage which intends to stay out of your way.
Plasma is powerful when needed, enabling the user to create the workflow that makes her more effective to complete her tasks.

Plasma never dictates the user’s needs, it only strives to solve them. Plasma never defines what the user is allowed to do, it only ensures that she can.

Our motivation is to enable actual work to happen, across devices, across different platforms, using any application needed.

We build to be durable, we create to be usable, we design to be elegant.

I’ve marked a few bits which are especially important in a bold font, let’s get into a bit more detail:

Cross-device — Plasma is a work environment for different classes of devices, it adapts to the form-factor and offers a user interface which is suitable for the device’s characteristics (input methods such as touchscreen, mouse, keyboard) and constraints (screen size, memory and CPU capabilties, etc.).

Define the workflow — Plasma is a flexible tool that can be set up as the user wishes and needs to make her more effective, to get the job done. Plasma is not a purpose in itself, it rather enables and gets out of the way. This isn’t to say that we’ll introduce every single option one can think of, but we strive to serve many users’ use cases.

Simple by default means that Plasma is self-explanatory to new users, and that it offers a clean and sober interface in its default state. We don’t want to overwhelm the user, but present a serene and friendly environment.

Powerful when needed on the other hand means that under the hood, Plasma offers tremendous power that allow to get almost any job done efficiently and without flailing.

We build to be durable, we create to be usable, we design to be elegant. — The end result is a stable workspace that the user can trust, that is friendly and easy to use, and that is beautiful and elegant in how it works.

Plasma at Akademy


As every year, also this year, I will be going to KDE’s yearly world summit, Akademy. This year, it will take place in Almería, Spain. In our presentation “Plasma: State of the Union“, Marco and I will talk about what’s going on in your favorite workspace, what we’ve been working on and what cool features are coming to you, and what our plans for the future are. Topics we will cover range Wayland, web browser integration, UI design, mobile and release and support planning. Our presentation will take place on Saturday at 11:05, right after the key note held by Robert Kaye. If you can’t make it to Spain next week, there will likely be video recordings, which I will post here as soon as they’re widely available.

Haste luego!

Plasma Meeting: Web, browsers and app bundles

This year’s Plasma Sprint is kindly being hosted by von Affenfels, a software company in Stuttgart, Germany, focusing on mobile apps. Let me try to give you an idea of what we’re working on this week.

Bundled apps

Welcome, KDE hackers!
Welcome, KDE hackers!
One problem we’re facing in KDE is that for Linux, our most important target platform, we depend on Linux distributors to ship our apps and updates for it. This is problematic on the distro side, since the work on packaging has to be duplicated by many different people, but it’s also a problem for application developers, since it may take weeks, months or until forever until an update becomes available for users. This is a serious problem and puts us far, far behind for example deployment cycles for webapps.

Bundled app technologies such as flatpak, appimage and snap solve this problem by allowing us to create one of these packages and deploy them across a wide range of distributions. That means that we could go as far as shipping apps ourselves and cutting out the distros as middle men. This has a bunch of advantages:

  • Releases and fixes can reach the user much quicker as we don’t have to wait for distros with their own cycles, policies and resources to pick up our updates
  • Users can easily get the lastest version of the software they need, without being bound to what the distro ships
  • Packaging and testing effort is vastly reduced as it has to only be done once, and not for every distro out there
  • Distros with less man-power, who may not be able to package and offer a lot of software can make available many more appliations,…
  • …and at the same time concentrate their efforts on the core of their OS

From a Plasma point of view, we want to concentrate on a single technology, and not three of them. My personal favorite is flatpak, as it is technologically the most advanced, it doesn’t rely on a proprietary and centralized server component. Unless Canonical changes the way they control snaps, flatpak should be the technology KDE concentrates on. This hasn’t been formally decided however, and the jury is still out. I think it’s important to realize that KDE isn’t served by adopting a technology for a process as important as software distribution that could be switched off by a single company. This would pose an unacceptable risk, and it would send the wrong signal to the rest of the Free software community.

How would this look like to the user? I can imagine KDE to ship applications directly. We already build our code on pretty much every commit, we are actually the best candidate to know how to build it properly. We’d integrate this seamlessly in Discover through the KDE store, and users should be able to install our applications very easily, perhaps similarly to openSUSE’s one click install, but based on appstream metadata.

Website work

Hackers hacking.
Hackers hacking.

We started off the meeting by going over and categorizing topics and then dove straight into the first topic: Communication and Design. There’s a new website for Plasma (and the whole of KDE) coming, thanks to the tireless work of Ken Vermette. We went over most of his recent work to review and suggest fixes, but also to get a bit excited about this new public face of Plasma. The website is part of a bigger problem: In KDE, we’re doing lots of excellent work, but we fail to communicate it properly, regularly and in ways and media that reach our target audience. In fact, we haven’t even clearly defined the target audience. This is something we want to tackle in the near future as well, so stay tuned.

But also webbrowsers….

KDE Plasma in 2017
KDE Plasma in 2017

Kai Uwe demo’ed his work on better integration of browsers: Native notifications instead of the out-of-place notifications created by the browser, controls for media player integration between Plasma and the browser (so your album artwork gets shown in the panel’s media controller), acccess to tabs, closing all incognito tabs from Plasma, including individual browser and a few more cool features. Plasma already has most of this functionality, so the bigger part of this has to be in the browser. Kai has implemented the browser side of things as an extension for Chromium (that’s what he uses, Firefox support is also planned), and we’re discussing how we can bring this extension to the attention of the users, possibly preinstalling it so you get the improvements in browser integration without having to spend a thought on it.

On and on…

We only just started our sprint, and there are many more things we’re working on and discussing. The above is my account of some things we discussed so far, but I’m planning to keep you posted.

Plasma’s road ahead

My Plasma Desktop in 2016
My Plasma Desktop in 2016
On Monday, KDE’s Plasma team held its traditional kickoff meeting for the new development cycle. We took this opportunity to also look and plan ahead a bit further into the future. In what areas are we lacking, where do we want or need to improve? Where do we want to take Plasma in the next two years?

Our general direction points towards professional use-cases. We want Plasma to be a solid tool, a reliable work-horse that gets out of the way, allowing to get the job done quickly and elegantly. We want it to be faster and of better quality than the competition.

With these big words out there, let’s have a look at some specifics we talked about.

Release schedule until 2018

Our plan is to move from 4 to 3 yearly releases in 2017 and 2018, which we think strikes a nice balance between our pace of development, and stabilization periods around that. Our discussion of the release schedule resulted in the following plan:

  • Plasma 5.9: 31 January 2017
  • Plasma 5.10: May 2017
  • Plasma 5.11: September 2017
  • Plasma 5.12: December 2017
  • Plasma 5.13: April 2018
  • Plasma 5.14 LTS: August 2018

A cautionary note, we can’t know if everything exactly plays out like this, as this schedule, to a degree depends on external factors, such as Qt’s release schedule. Here’s what we intend to do, it is really our “best guess”. Still, this aligns with Qt’s plans, who are also looking at an LTS release in summer 2018. So, what will these upcoming releases bring?

Breeze Look and Feel

Breeze Look and Feel

UI and Theming

The Breeze icon theme will see further completion work and refinements in its existing icons details. Icon usage over the whole UI will see more streamlining work as well. We also plan to tweak the Breeze-themed scrollbars a bit, so watch out for changes in that area. A Breeze-themed Firefox theme is planned, as well as more refinement in the widget themes for Qt, GTK, etc.. We do not plan any radical changes in the overall look and feel of our Breeze theme, but will further improve and evolve it, both in its light and dark flavors.

Feature back-log

The menu button is a first sign of the global menu returning to Plasma
The menu button is a first sign of the global menu returning to Plasma
One thing that many of our users are missing is support for a global menu similar to how MacOS displays application menus outside of the app’s window (for example at the top of the screen). We’re currently working on bringing this feature, which was well-supported in Plasma 4 back in Plasma 5, modernized and updated to current standards. This may land as soon as the upcoming 5.9 release, at least for X11.

Better support for customizing the locale (the system which shows things like time, currencies, numbers in the way the user expects them) is on our radar as well. In this area, we lost some features due to the transition to Frameworks 5, or rather QLocale, away from kdelibs’ custom, but sometimes incompatible locale handling classes.

Wayland

The next releases overall will bring further improvements to our Wayland session. Currently, Plasma’s KWin brings an almost feature-complete Wayland display server, which already works for many use-cases. It hasn’t seen the real-world testing it needs, and it is lacking certain features that our users expect from their X11 session, or new features which we want to offer to support modern hardware better.
We plan to improve multi-screen rendering on Wayland and the input stack in areas such as relative pointers, pointer confinement, touchpad gestures, wacom tablet support, clipboard management (for example, Klipper). X11 dependencies in KWin will be further reduced with the goal to make it possible to start up KWin entirely without hard X11 dependencies.
One new feature which we want to offer in our Wayland session is support for scaling the contents of each output individually, which allows users to use multiple displays with vastly varying pixel densities more seamlessly.
There are also improvements planned around virtual desktops under Wayland, as well as their relation to Plasma’s Activities features. Output configuration as of now is also not complete, and needs more work in the coming months. Some features we plan will also need changes in QtWayland, so there’s some upstream bug-fixing needed, as well.

One thing we’d like to see to improve our users’ experience under Wayland is to have application developers test their apps under Wayland. It happens still a bit too often that an application ends up running into a code-path that makes assumptions that X11 is used as display server protocol. While we can run applications in backwards-compatible XWayland mode, applications can benefit from the better rendering quality under Wayland only when actually using the Wayland protocol. (This is mostly handled transparantly by Qt, but applications do their thing, so unless it’s tested, it will contain bugs.)

Mobile

Plasma’s Mobile flavor will be further stabilized, and its stack cleaned up, we are further reducing the stack’s footprint without losing important functionality. The recently-released Kirigami framework, which allows developers to create convergent applications that work on both mobile and desktop form-factors, will be adjusted to use the new, more light-weight QtQuick Controls 2. This makes Kirigami a more attractive technology to create powerful, yet lean applications that work across a number of mobile and desktop operating systems, such as Plasma Mobile, Android, iOS, and others.

Plasma Discover
Discover, Plasma’s software center integrates online content from the KDE Store, its convergent user-interface is provided by the Kirigami framework

Online Services

Planned improvements in our integration of online services are dependency handling for assets installed from the store. This will allow us to support installation of meta-themes directly from the KDE Store. We want to also improve our support for online data storage, prioritizing Free services, but also offer support for proprietary services, such as the GDrive support we recently added to Plasma’s feature-set.

Developer Recruitment

We want to further increase our contributor base. We plan to work towards an easier on-boarding experience, through better documentation, mentoring and communication in general. KDE is recruiting, so if you are looking for a challenging and worthwhile way to work as part of a team, or on your individual project, join our ranks of developers, artists, sysadmins, translators, documentation writers, evangelists, media experts and free culture activists and let us help each other.

facelift

I’ve done a facelift to my website. The new version is more mobile-friendly, modern-looking and quite a departure visually from its original look. I’ve chosen for a newpaper-like, typography-based responsive layout. My site finally also supports SSL, thanks to let’s encrypt.

Going to Akademy
Next week, I’ll be going to Akademy, which is co-hosted with QtCon. As usual, my focus will be around Plasma-related topics. I’ll also hold a presentation about a KDE software store.

Getting physical

plasma-cernbannerI’ve just finished my travel preparations for this year’s Plasma sprint, which will start tomorrow with the arrival of my fellow hackers in Geneva, CH. Together with a few other groups in KDE and organized by our WikiToLearn friends, we’re honored to be guests at CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research where physicists and engineers are probing the fundamental structure of the universe. Of course, these scientists and engineers couldn’t do their work without Plasma, so we’re obliged to hold our meeting there. :-)

Topics range from our Wayland support to Plasma Mobile, documentation, how we can improve our desktop experience, and general planning for the next months. I’m also looking forward to some face-time with my fellow hackers, and discussions with the artists and usability experts who are holding a meeting of the visual design group in KDE. Only good stuff can come out of this.

Many thanks go to all the people who support KDE. This support makes meetings like next week’s possible. Please consider supporting us.