IKEA Trådfri first impressions

Warm white lights
Warm white lights
Since I’ve been playing with various home automation technologies for some time already, I thought I’d also start writing about it. Be prepared for some blogs about smart lighting, smart home and related technologies.

Most recently, I’ve gotten myself a few items from IKEA new product range of smartlight. It’s called trådfri (Swedish for wireless). These lights can be remote-controlled using a smartphone app or other kinds of switches. These products are still fairly young, so I thought I’d give them a try. Overall. the system seems well thought-through and feels fairly high-end. I didn’t notice any major annoyances.

First Impressions

Trådfri hub and dimmer
Trådfri hub and dimmer

My first impressions are actually pretty good. Initially, I bought a hub which is used to control the lights centrally. This hub is required to be able to use the smartphone app or update the firmware of any component (more on that later!). If you just want to use one of the switches or dimmers that come separately, you won’t need the hub.
Setting everything up is straight-forward, the documentation is fine and no special skills are needed to install these smartlights. Unpacking unfortunately means the usual fight with blister packaging (will it ever stop?), but after that, a few handy surprises awaited me. What I liked:
Hub hides cables
Hub hides cables

  • The light is nice and warm. The GU10 bulbs i got give 400 lumens and are dimmable. For my taste, they could be a bit darker at the lower end of the scale, but overall, the light feels comfy warm and not too cold, but not too yellow either. The GU10 bulbs I got are spec’ed at 2700 Kelvin. No visible flickering either.
  • Trådfri components are relatively inexpensive. A hub, dimmer and 4 warm-white GU10 bulbs set me back about 75€. It is way cheaper than comparable smartlights, for example Philips Hue. As needs are fairly individual exact prices are best looked up on IKEA’s website by yourself.
  • The hub has a handy cable storage function, you can roll up excessive cable inside the hub — a godsend if you want to have the slightest chance of preventing a spaghetti situation.
  • The hub is USB-powered, 1A power supply suffices, so you may be able to plug it into the USB port of some other device, or share a power supply.
  • The dimmer can be removed from the cradle. The cradle can be stuck on any flat surface, it doesn’t need additional cabling, and you can easily take out the dimmer and carry it around.
  • The wireless technology used is ZigBee, which is a standard thing and also used by other smarthome technologies, most notably, Philips Hue. I already own (and love) some Philips Hue lights, so in theory I should be able to pair up the Trådfri lights with my already existing Hue lights. (This is a big thing for me, I don’t want to have different lighting networks around in my house, but rather concert the whole lighting centrally.)

Pairing IKEA Trådfri with Philips Hue

Let’s call this “work in progress”, meaning, I haven’t yet been able to pair a Trådfri bulb with my Hue system. I’ll dig some more into it, and I’m pretty sure I’ll make it work at some point. If you’re interested in combining Hue and Trådfri bulbs, I’ll suffice with a couple of pointers:

If you want to try this yourself, make sure you get the most recent lights from the store (the clerk was helpful to me and knowledgable, good advice there!). You’ll also likely need a hub at least for updating the firmware. If you’re just planning to use the bulbs together with a Hue system, you won’t need the hub later on, so that may seem like 30€ down the drain. Bit of a bummer, but depending on how many lights you’ll be buying, given the difference in price between IKEA and Philips, it may well be worth it.

\edit: After a few more tries, the bulb is now paired to the Philips Hue system. More testing will ensue, and I’ll either update this post, or write a new one.

2 thoughts on “IKEA Trådfri first impressions

  1. You may also be interested in running Home Assistant (https://home-assistant.io/) if you think about extending your smart home a little further. Of course there are alternatives like openHAB2 and both may profit from additionally using Node-RED for the programming logic and bringing even more things together. Home Assistant is Python3 based, has a neat UI which gets you going very fast and the development is very fast paced. Personally I use Home Assistant as a GUI and for managing multimedia stuff (Snapcast/Mopidy/Chromecast/AV-Receiver), Node-RED for the programming and Loxone as the (sadly) proprietary back-end for my wired smart home.

    1. Definitely true, in fact I sent my first pull request to home-assistant in earlier today. (It’s unrelated to smart lights, adds support for an air quality sensor). :-)

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