to not breathe

I’ve always loved diving down while snorkeling or swimming, and it’s been intriguing to me how long I can hold my breath, how far and deep I could go just like that. (The answer so far, 14m.)

Last week, I met with Jeanine Grasmeijer. Jeanine is one of the world’s top freedivers, two times world record holder, 11 times Dutch national record holder. She can hold her breath for longer than 7 minutes. Just last month she dove down to -92m without fins. (For the mathematically challenged, that’s 6.6 times 14m.)

Diving with Jeanine Grasmeijer
Diving with Jeanine Grasmeijer
Jeanine showed me how to not breathe properly.
We started with relaxation and breathing exercises on dry land. Deep relaxation, breathing using the proper and most effective technique, then holding  breath and recovering.
In the water, this actually got a bit easier. Water has better pressure characteristics on the lungs, and the mammalian diving reflex helps shutting off the air ways, leading to a yet more efficient breath hold. A cycle starts with breathing in the water through the snorkel for a few minutes, focusing on a calm and regular, relaxed breathing rhythm. After a few cycles of static apnea (breath holding under water, no movement), I passed the three-minute-mark at 3:10.
We then moved on to dynamic apnea (swimming a horizontal distance under water on one breath). Jeanine did a careful weight check with me, making sure my position would need as little as possible correction movements while swimming. With a reasonable trim achieved, I swam some 50m, though we mainly focused not on distance, but on technique of finning, arms usage and horizontal trim.
The final exercise in the pool was about diving safety. We went over the procedure to surface an unconscious diver, and get her back to her senses.

Freediving, as it turns out, is a way to put the world around on pause for a moment. You exist in the here and now, as if the past and future do not exist. The mind is in a completely calm state, while your body floats in a world of weightless balance. As much as diving is a physical activity, it can be a way to enter a state of Zen in the under water world.

Jeanine has not only been a kind, patient and reassuring mentor to me, but opened the door to a world which has always fascinated and intrigued me. A huge, warm thanks for so much inspiration of this deep passion!

Harbor porpoise Michael
The cutest whale in the world!

In other news on the “mammals that can hold their breath really well” topic: I’ve adopted a cute tiny orphaned whale!