LTS releases align neatly for Plasma 5.8

Our upcoming release, Plasma 5.8 will be the first long-term supported (LTS) release of the Plasma 5 series. One great thing of this release is that it aligns support time-frames across the whole stack from the desktop through Qt and underlying operating systems. This makes Plasma 5.8 very attractive for users need to that rely on the stability of their computers.

Qt, Frameworks & Plasma

In the middle layer of the software stack, i.e. Qt, KDE Frameworks and Plasma, the support time-frames and conditions roughly look like this:

Qt 5.6

Qt 5.6 has been released in March as the first LTS release in the Qt 5 series. It comes with a 3-year long-term support guarantee, meaning it will receive patch releases providing bug fixes and security updates.

Frameworks 5.26

In tune with Plasma, during the recent Akademy we have decided to make KDE Frameworks, the libraries that underlie Plasma and many KDE applications 18 months of security support and fixes for major bugs, for example crashes. These updates will be shipped as needed for single frameworks and also appear as tags in the git repositories.

Plasma 5.8

The core of our long-term support promise is that Plasma 5.8 will receive at least 18 months of bugfix and security support from upstream KDE. Patch releases with bugfix, security and translation updates will be shipped in fibonacci rhythm.
To make this LTS extra reliable, we’ve concentrated the (still ongoing) development cycle for Plasma 5.8 on stability, bugfixes, performance improvements and overall polish. We want this to shine.
There’s one caveat, however: Wayland support excluded from long-term-support promises, as it is too experimental. X11 as display server is fully supported, of course.

Neon and Distros

You can enjoy these LTS releases from the source through a Neon flavor that ships an updated LTS stack based on Ubuntu’s 16.04 LTS version. openSuse Leap, which focuses on stability and continuity also ships Plasma 5.8, making it a perfect match.
The Plasma team encourages other distros to do the same.

Post LTS

After the 5.8 release, and during its support cycle, KDE will continue to release feature updates for Plasma which are supported through the next development cycle as usual.
Lars Knoll’s Qt roadmap talk (skip to 29:25 if you’re impatient and want to miss an otherwise exciting talk) proposes another Qt LTS release around 2018, which may serve as a base for future planning in the same direction.

It definitely makes a lot of sense to align support time-frames for releases vertically across the stack. This makes support for distributions considerably easier, creates a clearer base for planning for users (both private and institutional) and effectively leads to less headaches in daily life.

Announcing the KDE Software Store

KDE Store
KDE Store
Big news: Today, KDE announced a new software store, and that the source code for this new service has been released as Free software under the AGPL, fixing a long standing bug in KDE software: reliance on a proprietary web service.

That also means that KDE has a new software store that replaces the opendesktop sites. The migration has been happening in the background, so you may actually have used the new store from within Plasma or applications to install add-ons already without noticing it!

We have great plans for the store, one of them being that we want to offer download (and easy installation) of binary packages through containerized bundled formats such as Flatpak, Snappy and/or AppImage.

Stay tuned for more, for now, please celebrate with us a Plasma desktop (and KDE applications) that are more Free than ever before.

Update: I’ve uploaded slides, and there’s a video of my presentation online now.

Plasma at QtCon

QtCon opening keynote
QtCon opening keynote

QtCon 2016 is a special event: it co-hosts KDE’s Akademy, the Qt Contributor summit, the FSFE summit, the VideoLan dev days and KDAB’s training day into one big conference. As such, the conference is buzzing with developers and Free software people (often both traits combined in one person).

Naturally, the Plasma team is there with agenda’s filled to the brim: We want to tell more people about what Plasma has to offer, answer their questions, listen to their feedback and rope them in to work with us on Plasma. We have also planned a bunch of sessions to discuss important topics, let me give some examples:

  • Release Schedule — Our current schedule was based on the needs of a freshly released “dot oh” version (Plasma 5.0), Plasma 5 is now way more mature. Do we want to adjust our release schedule of 4 major versions a year to that?
  • Convergence — How can we improve integration of touch-friendly UIs in our workflows?
  • What are our biggest quality problems right now, and what are we going to do about it?
  • How do we make Plasma Mobile available on more devices, what are our next milestones?
  • How can we improve the Plasma session start?
  • What’s left to make Plasma on Wayland ready for prime-time?
  • How can we improve performance further?
  • etc.

You see, we’re going to be really busy here. You won’t see results of this next week, but this kind of meeting is important to flesh out our development for the next months and years.

All good
All good? – All good!