Inside the Particle Accelerator

IMG_20160311_164446We visited the CMS today, the Compact Muon Solenoid, one of the “experiments” that are part of the LHC, the large hadron collider, which is a research project aiming to find out more about the basic structures that make up our universe, like how gravity works, which particles make up our universe, and so on.

In order to do that, researchers accelerate elementary particles to almost the speed of light, make them crash into each other and record this process. There’s a 27km long circular tunnel 100m below the ground near Geneva, Switzerland (the tunnel actually extends into France, so the CMS experiment is located in France).

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As we’re currently at a KDE Plasma sprint at CERN, the European Research center for nuclear energie, we were invited to a tour through the CMS. We got to learn a lot about physics and also descended down into the chamber holding the giant CMS machine. (It’s switched off currently, since energy costs during winter are too high to run it — it takes a lot of power to accelerate particles to almost the speed of light, in the range of 200 Megawatt). There’s some maintenance work going on right now before this monster is switched on again towards the end of the month.

CERN staff were friendly and patient and answered all our questions. The tour was interesting and a lot of fun.

Here are some more pictures I took during the visit. You may notice that some of the computers in the control room are running Plasma on their desktops.
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More photos of my visit can be found here.