Archive for the ‘Personal’ Category

Cuba Diving.

Sunday, May 3rd, 2015

Spectacular sunset at Maria la Gorda

Spectacular sunset at Maria la Gorda

I recently went on a vacation to Cuba. As I wanted to go scuba diving there, I researched a bit beforehand. The information I could dig up was spotty at times, so I decided to share my notes in order to add it as anecdotal information when planning their diving trips.

During the 3 week trip to Cuba, I visited three locations in the south-western part of the island. In total, I did 19 dives along the Cuba coast, all of them very enjoyable. On the list were shallow (10-18m) coral reef dives, wall dives, some of them deep. I clocked my max depth at 34.1m. One of the things I wanted to do was a cave dive in a Cenote. Cenotes are underwater cave systems found around the geological area.

General Considerations

Dive boat at Maria la Gorda

Dive boat at Maria la Gorda

Cuba, being a Carribean island has a tropical climate with warm waters around it, and climatically a wet and a dry season. As the wet season may make the sea choppy, reduce visibility and carries the risk of hurricanes, it’s advisable to pick the dry seasons, months from November to May for diving activities. The South coast, which is where I have been diving had warm waters 27°C at the surface, and 26°C as depths down to about 35m. Visibility was generally excellent, commonly around 30m, with sometimes up to 50-60m in calm water. In several spots, there are large and well-preserved coral reefs. The South coast usually has calmer waters than the North coast, so I picked locations in the South-West: Maria La Gorda at the far southwestern point of the island, Playa Girón at the Bay of Pigs, and Playa Ancón near Trinidad. All turned out to be worth visiting and made for some amazing dives. (We also visited Cayo Levisa on Cuba’s Northern shore, which has a nice beach, but was mediocre at best for snorkeling from the shore. Go to Cayo Jutia instead, if you want good snorkeling, or book the boat to go diving at Cayo Levisa.)
Cuba is a communist country, instead of Coca Cola advertisements you’ll find some billboard reminding you that “the revolution is invincible”. Economic trade embargoes make acquiring scuba diving gear a problem (although I haven’t seen any shortcomings in this area myself). There’s usually just one dive center running the diving operations, so not much choice, but on the other hand, you’ll rarely encounter crowded dive sites, or reduced visibility due to other divers silting up the waters.

Touristic activities such as diving are usually possible through government-owned dive centers. There’s a network of official travel agents across the country, which can help you with booking trips and getting in contact with dive centers. Many of them are not easily reachable by phone, but you can sometimes book in advance of your trip online. In my experience, it would have been fine to just show up at the dive center at the right time of the day with your certification card and dive logs to prove your experience, and you’ll be almost good to go. I decided to bring my own gear, regulator, jacket BCD, 3mm wetsuit, fins, mask and torch in order to avoid any annoyances or unsafe situations due to flaky equipment.

My personal experience has been very positive, I loved the different dive sites, guides were generally skilled, and I had a whole bunch of amazing dives in Cuba. Would recommend.

Maria la Gorda

Maria la Gorda's beach

Maria la Gorda’s beach

Maria la Gorda is a bit off the beaten path in Cuba, one of the more remote locations on the main land. We travelled there from Vinales in 3 hours by car. The location itself is comprised of a hotel, two restaurants, and dive centre on a beautiful beach that also makes for some very nice snorkeling, you can basically walk in and enjoy lots of fish, even those not often discovered while scuba diving. Kim spotted barracuda, jacks, parrot fish, a moray and even an octopus just a few meters off the beach.
Diving there is done by boat 3 times a day. Almost all of the diving spots are within a 15min boat ride. The dive boat goes to 3 different sites a day, at 8:30, 11:00 and 15:00. It’s possible to also do a night dive, but has to be arranged with the staff. If you’re doing a day trip from Vinales just for diving, you’ll arrive in time to do two dives before leaving, the dive center does consider day guests. The surface time in between was enough to not dip too deep into nitrogen levels with 3 daily dives, the first two of them deep. Dives are usually limited to 45′ bottom time. If in general, you can’t get enough of scuba diving, that’s a lot of diving there.
The sites I’ve visited were all amazing in their own rights. Beautiful walls littered with coral, dropping down to 2000m right below you, really nice tunnels to dive through, large fan corals, barrel sponges of 3m and more, large groupers, jacks, and the usual variety of coral reef fish (parrot, box fish, angelfish, jacks, butterfly fish, etc.). Fish of more than 50cm in size were no exception, which seems like a sign that at least this part of the Carribean is comparably less overfished than other areas, there and especially in Asian countries.
The procedures on the boat were a bit unclear, I had liked to get better introduction there. Other people were happy to help, so this wasn’t much of a problem. The guides’ briefings were too short for my taste, especially knowing a bit about the navigation planned underwater would help to keep the group together more closely and in the end improves safety. I’ve asked the guide to tell me about the planned route under water, which he did in the following dives. That allowed me to take some responsibility myself (I really like to know under water that everybody who went into the water comes out of it as well). That said, there’s always room for improvement, and it didn’t lead to any dangerous situations. Taking responsibility for your buddies is part of diving, and as long as everybody takes it seriously, no problem.

Bahía de Cochinos (Bay of Pigs)

Museum in Playa Giron

Museum in Playa Giron

The Bay of Pigs is historically known for an attempt by the CIA to invade Cuba with US-friendly troops and overthrow the then-young communist government. Lack of political support from the US government, underestimation of the Cuban revolutionary troops and insufficient secrecy lead to an utter failure of the invasion attempt. Nowadays, the bay of pigs is a rather calm area, with excellent scuba diving. Basically, the eastern shore of the bay is lined with a coral reef wall very close to the shore. Commonly, one would do a shore entry here, swim out about 100m and then drop into the wall.
I dove with Ronel’s local dive operation. A tweaked bus would pick us up in the morning, go to the dive center (next to the government run hotel in Playa Giron) to gear up, and then drive up North for 10 – 20 minutes to one of the dive spots along the bay, then do two shore dives from there. We’d return around 1 o’clock in the afternoon, so there’s plenty of time for other activities (which, to be fair there aren’t that many apart from the beach and a “not-quite-neutral” museum about the failed invasion attempt).

The Cenote Dive

Entering the Cenote

Entering the Cenote

Cenotes are sinkholes in the shallow limestone ground near the coast. Small pools filled with fresh surface waters lead to extended cave systems flooded with salt water, so one enters a fresh water pool in the woods, then descends through a haloclyne. This haloclyne is the border between fresh and salt water. The caves were usually filled with salt water seeping in from the sea, but as there are almost no currents, rain water that comes in from above stays on top as fresh water. The haloclyne produces a weird disturbed visual effect when one dives through it, but above and underneath it, visibility is clear. These sink holes are often quite deep, the one we entered was 26m deep at entry point, the deepest points of the cave system went down to 60m. We entered into a tunnel, a vertical crack in the limestone about 1m wide, so wide enough to comfortably swim through. During the dive, we made our way about 350m into the cave to a maximum depth of 32m. As the shape of the cave determines the dive profile, I ended up having to add an extra decompression stop before surfacing.
We went through a lower tunnel into a larger cave, which had some beautiful sunlight shining in through cracks above in blue-green colors. Visibility was excellent, and the sunrays produced an almost magical ray of sunlight in the water of the deeper cave.
Descending into the Cenote

Descending into the Cenote

Through the haloclyne above us, the sunlight was broken by the different densities of air, fresh and salt water until they hit the particles drifting in the water or the walls and bottom and of the cave. This dive was guided by a specialized cave diving guide. Briefings were thorough, and after a first reef dive to check everyone’s buoyancy and general diving skills, we did our second dive of the day in the Cenote. I’ve found this video, which gives an impression how such a dive looks like. If you’re an advanced diver, comfortable with overhead environments and experienced enough, I’d definitely recommend doing a Cenote dive, For me, it’s been an unforgettable experience.

Playa Ancón

Playa Ancón is the beach village close to Trinidad. It’s a peninsula at about 7km from Trinidad. I’ve found it a bit complicated to book the diving there. Tour operator in Trinidad would tell me that everything’s fully booked, but inquiring at the dive center in Playa Ancon, I was told to just show up before 9am and I should be fine. That’s what I did, and it was indeed no problem to go diving there. We’d enter the boat from the beach and would go out a few hundred meters, just too much to swim there comfortably.
Even with a bit of a choppy sea that day, the diving was excellent. Good guides lead me over an interesting seascape with sandbed-“roads” in between coral fields, and much life in between. Highlights of these dives were a wreck, which lay across two large rocks and created a swimthrough this way, a school of tuna (about 40 fish), and a 1.2m large eagle ray. Water was warm and visibility in the range of 15m (considered quite bad for the location, so expect better when you get there). The dive shop was run professionally, but be prepared for a “laid-back scheduling”, which means depending on the day, two boat dives with a surface interval on shore might run into the early afternoon. (I’m mentioning it here, since every other dive center I dove with in Cuba was exceptionally punctual, contrary to what I had read before.)

Spring dive.

Monday, March 9th, 2015


Spring is just showing its first rays of sun, so we went diving today. We did a shallow dive in the morning in a lake close by, which is known for decent diving. The water was 4°C, so really chilly for a recreational dive, visibility under water about 5-7m, which is quite good for this kind of water. During our dive, we had really nice light as we didn’t go very deep and it’s been a really sunny day.

I’ve used Lycra undergarment and a 2mm neoprene bodywarmer under a 5mm wetsuit, 5mm neoprene gloves, hood and boots. My coldest dive so far was in 18 degrees water (in the same lake, late summer), so water that cold was quite something new. Richard, my buddy has a lot of experience also in these conditions, so I was in excellent hands.

After an initial bit of a shock when we entered the water, and a quick weighting / buoyancy check I gained back my serene diving breathing rhythm and started trusting the suit enough to become comfortable that it would keep me warm enough to take it for a swim. We went under for almost half an hour, but also took first signs of hypothermia seriously, in order to keep it safe and healthy. During the dive, we saw some fun fresh water lobsters, but also a fairly dormant ecosystem. I wanted to test out my new equipment, wireless integrated tank pressure gauge, jacket BCD, fins, regulator and an air tank I’ve borrowed from a neighbor, aside from the different layers of the suit.

I’m really happy with the new gear, everything functions perfectly, and there’s nothing that doesn’t have a clear purpose. I’ve taken a couple of notes for the next dive with this equipment, though those are only small adjustments, such as strapping on the tank a bit lower for a better weight distribution (which translates to a more hydrodynamic body position, meaning less exertion, lower air consumption and a more relaxed dive).

My next dive will be in 26°C water. Phew.

Trusty Old Router

Wednesday, December 10th, 2014

Linksys WRT54G
I decommissioned a fine piece of hardware today. This access point brought the first wireless connectivity to my place. It’s been in service for more than 11 years, and is still fully functional.

In the past years, the device has been running OpenWRT, which is a really nice and very powerful little Linux distribution specifically for this kind of routers. OpenWRT actually sprang from the original firmware for this device, and was extended, updated, improved and made available for a wide range of hardware. OpenWRT lately has made this piece of hardware useful, and I’m really thankful for that. It also a shows how much value releasing firmware under an Open Source license can add to a product. Aside from the long-term support effect of releasing the firmware, updated firmware would add features to the router which were otherwise only available in much more expensive hardware.

The first custom firmware I ran on this device was Sveasoft. In the long run, this ended up not being such a good option, since the company producing the software really stretched the meaning of the GPL — while you were technically allowed to share software with others, doing so would end your support contract with the company — no updates for you. LWN has a good write-up about this story.

Bitter-sweet gadget-melancholy aside, the replacement access point brings a 4 times speed increase to the wifi in my home office: less finger-twiddling, more coding. :)

Looking back, looking ahead.

Monday, July 8th, 2013

Dragon- and Jackfruit, coffee, cocoa, tobacco, chocolate, palm sugar and tahoe from JavaThis year’s general assembly of KDE e.V. during Akademy will be my last one as a member of the KDE e.V.‘s Board of Directors. I had been elected during Akademy 2006 in Dublin, and since then served the KDE community by working on organisational bits necessary to support a Free Software project. We’ve seen times where our environment wildly changed, times of growth, consolidation, growing pains. Looking back fills me with satisfaction how we have developed KDE e.V. as an organisation. I think KDE e.V. is exemplary in many ways for other Free Software, and Free Culture projects. One of the cornerstones here is continuity, we simply had the time to learn a lot, to define and implement necessary processes around administration, fund-raising, legal questions, conference organisation and many more. As it stands today, KDE e.V. is an organisation that provides the continuity necessary for a community to think ahead, and the necessary infrastructure to foster and support those next steps. KDE e.V. is also an organisation that constantly evolves, reacting, but also foreseeing and preparing for the next steps. We have a well-functioning team in place to guide this, and I’m confident that the current and coming board members will keep developing KDE e.V. as an organisation towards its goal of supporting KDE.

The Merapi volcano, as seen from the BorobodurEarlier this year, I had also resigned from my role as one of KDE’s release managers. When I joined the release time, around KDE 3.5 (our software compilation was still called KDE back then), our release process was becoming dysfunctional. In KDE 3 times, coolo (to some known as Stephan Kulow) was the release dude, and it was all in his hands. He did a great job, but, just like in many other areas of KDE, embodied a single point of failure. Not that he, or others we relied on, ever failed, but it’s usually more a matter of statistics than personal skills, attitude and motivation. For critical tasks (and actually releasing all the work of such a community for others to use is a pretty critical one!), you want a team in place that can fall back on each other, both to spread workload and risks. Afin, KDE needed release managers, and after a detour through a more official body (the KDE e.V.-elected Technical Working Group, for those who remember this episode), it became clear that only a self-motivated group of people that want to get the job done will work. In hindsight, this sounds completely natural and closely aligned to KDE’s way of achieving things, but I think this way had to be walked, we have learned from it, and in the end, there’s a competent team in place which can deliver our software in time and quality. As being on the release team is work, and at times quite a lot, I wanted to get rid of this eventually. I managed to pull out, I think without leaving too much of a hole. A few releases have been done without me actively particating. Probably, most people won’t even have noticed. Perfect.

So am I on the way out? Most certainly not! I’ve been consistently shifting from organisational tasks to more technically oriented work, which to me personally, is a good development. I simply get more kicks out of writing code than reading emails. In that regard, I think I’m in good company.

The sun rising over BaliOn a professional level, I’ve been working for Blue Systems on Plasma’s upcoming version for a while now. I’m spending most of my time on Plasma and our Frameworks 5 effort, and enjoy that a lot. It gives me both the time to intimately understand more parts of our codebase, and much opportunity to learn new things and improve and develop existing skills. The work happens entirely within KDE infrastructure and community, and I’ve got a bunch of great colleagues who are equally eager to take big steps, technologically with our codebase. My role has now shifted a bit to also include team coordination tasks, which is an interesting exercise. On the one hand, a geographically spread team is harder to keep track of, but this is offset by the great motivation, skills and attitude of my colleagues (within both Blue Systems and KDE).

Incense in a buddhistic templeLuckily, my life’s not all KDE and the serious business of software development. In May, Kim and me travelled to Indonesia. We spent a few nights in the jungle of Borneo, took a walk with Orang Utans. We planted trees, and slept the nights on the deck of our boat acompanied by jungle noises and clear skies. On Java, we visited the Borobodur, a giant buddhistic temple, one of the 7 wonders of the world, we learnt about the roots (literally and figuratively) of many conveniences such as coffee, rice, tobacco and latex. We climbed up a Volcano. From Java, we set off to Bali, travelled along its North coast and then spent some time on Gili Trawangan, which is part of a group of sandy, tropical islands just off the coast of Lombok. The time in Bali and on the Gilis did my scuba diving skills really well. The area is excellent for diving with warm waters and amazing marine life. My finning technique has improved vastly and I’ve got dehydration under control much better now. During our dives we spotted lots of coral, soft and hard, vast amounts of colourful reef fish, turtles, reef sharks, morays, sea snakes. The abundance of colour and life was enchanting, though fragile.

With all that said, some of you will meet me later this week in Bilbao for Akademy. I will arrive on Wednesday already, going to see Depeche Mode and The Editors at BKK festival. If you want to talk Frameworks5, Plasma2 or anything else which lies in my line of interest: Talk to me.

Inspirations from 2012

Tuesday, December 11th, 2012

a young visitor to HampiI’ve attended in Bangalore two weeks ago. is the largest Indian Free software conference, and has been on my list of conferences to ever attend for a long time. I’m back home for a good week now, so it’s time to recap a bit my experiences there. I travelled together with Lydia, a.k.a. Nightrose, who was attending on behalf of Wikimedia to tell about Wikidata. For the conference, I was scheduled for a talk about Plasma Active, and we also did a workshop on creating device-adaptive interfaces. More on that later.

Lydia and I went a few days earlier, to have some time to see Bangalore and surroundings. It was my first time in India, so also a good opportunity to see a few new things here and there, and to acclimatize. On the first day, we went around the city a bit, and later were invited to PES-IT, a renowned Indian IT college, where a 24hour open source hackathon would take place. Lydia and I held ad-hoc presentations about getting involved with KDE and Plasma Active respectively, followed by hands-on demos and discussions about both technical and non-technical issues. The students and professors were very friendly, and it was awesome to see enthusiastic students spending their weekend together hacking. We only arrived late at night back at our hotel, after some long and enlightening discussions about Free software and Indian culture. What struck me in particular (and in a very positive way) was the number of girls attending, about one third. In most “Western” countries, information technology is very much a male trade, Dutch universities for example struggle to attract more than one or maybe two girls each year for their computer science courses. India is way ahead there, which on the one hand is great to see, but on the other hand raises the question what is going wrong in my home country. Free software communities suffer from the same skewed demographic, so the same question applies here.


Jean-Baptiste (j-b) of VLC arrived two days after us, and we all hopped on a nightbus to Hampi, a UNESCO heritage site, an old capital of a long-gone empire and religious centre a few hours North-West of Bangalore. There, we spent an unforgettable day, from watching (and participating) in the morning ritual of washing your body in the river, sipping a glass of chai, having a wonderful breakfast under the Mango Tree, watching temples in a beautiful surrounding, more wonderful curries, chais, temples and friendly people to enjoying the sunset from the top of a mountain.


On Thursday, started. One of the booths that struck me first was the stand of Aakash, which is a low-cost tablet meant for students. The tablet is procured by the Indian government under the supervision of the Indian Institute of Technology in Bombay (IIT-Bombay). It is running a dualboot Linux/Android system right now. The Aakash people have already looked into Plasma Active (they prefer it much to Android, but there were some problems getting it to run on their hardware. The hardware is a 7″ tablet with a a capacitive screen, 512MB RAM and otherwise an Allwinner A13 chip with Mali400 GPU. That should just be powerful to enough to run Plasma Active. I got demoed a few applications, both under Android and Linux which quickly revealed why Android was not the best choice: Android basically made a lot of apps run 3 times slower. In the course of the next days, I sat down with IIT’s developers to look into problems they had with getting PA to run. We made some progress, and fleshed out strategies how to get it to run. One bigger hurdle is the lack of a good graphics driver, other tasks involve “relatively simple” system integration tasks. Doable, it seems, and a wonderful opportunity to bring KDE’s software to a very large new group of users.One thing that struck me as genius in this project is that it is not limited to procuring hardware and getting it to boot, but a large part (60+% of the budget) is allocated to content creation. Software is created under the GPL, content under Creative Commons, non-commercial licenses. Translation of content is an integral part of the project, so this initial Freeing of educational content has the potential of being very useful far outside of India as well. Visionary.
As with any big project, there are also critical voices. Hardware is one issue, building a relationship of trust with Chinese manufacturers is not easy, as is getting the manufacturer to understand the constraints and requirements of Free software. I wish the Aakash project all the success it needs however, and we will continue to support the goals of the project. This could be the beginning of a wonderful thing. :)

Plasma Active Presentation and Workshop

Holy cows feeding on trashOn the first day, I held a presentation about Plasma Active, its approach, technology, goals and so on. The talk took place in the main hall and was well attended. I collected some valuable feedback, and am happy that people understand the ideas and believe them to be right. The next day, we held a KDE miniconf, where Shantanu and me did a workshop on developing device-adaptive apps. In the workshop, we outlined the process from idea to running code on a device, and dug into details. We had about 50 interested visitors, the workshop itself was quite interactive, and we did some live-coding, it was a lot of fun to do. 2013?

During the conference it became evident, that the Indian KDE and Free software community would very much like to organize an Indian KDE conference again. After 2011, which was a great success, this seemed like a good idea, so we did some planning on that, asked if people were willing to volunteer in the organization and outlined a few possible options. The discussion has moved on to the kde-india mailinglist, so if you are among the people who would love to see 2013 happen, join the list and add your ideas and man/girlpower!

The Internet of Things

One of the presentations I attended during was by Priya Kuber, who works for Arduino. Arduino produces a open source hardware microcontroller aimed at educational purposes. The talk was very inspiring, so I wondered if I could use this for some home automation tasks, as simple example a remote power switch to turn on my workstation in the office, or somesuch. Priya sat down with me and quickly got me going with my own basic programme for the Arduino microcontroller, and it was all very easy and fun. Back home I ordered an Arduino starter kit, which has already arrived and contains basically what I’d call a kid’s microcontroller wet dream, it has the Arduino Uno board, LEDs, sensors for light, temperature, an LCD display and a bunch of other small electronic components along with a nice book. Surely something to spend the calmer Christmas days with, old style. :)
Still in India, I sat down for an afternoon and hacked up some code to use with this little project, and got already quite far. The idea is to connect the Arduino to my RaspberryPi (which is energy-efficient enough to run 24/7), run a small http server on the RPi and use that to remote control physical devices at home from a remote location (I’d like to think of a tropical island here ;)). I’ve implemented the server in twisted Python, it presents a JSON interface, which can be directly consumed from a QML Plasmoid, on either my laptop or any Plasma Active device. I didn’t get around to doing the actually interesting hardware part, yet. Maybe this is the feable start of using KDE technologies for home automation and domotica?

I would like to thank the KDE e.V., the foundation for the KDE community, for supporting my trip. You can also pitch in here, to make participation of KDE contributors in this kind of events possible by Joining the Game.

Back in Brazil

Tuesday, July 24th, 2012

I got up rather early this morning to catch a flight from Amsterdam across the ocean (and equator) down to Brazil, where on Wednesday FISL (Forum Internacional Software Libre) will start. Right now, I’m temporarily stranded in a bar at Sao Paulo airport, waiting for my connecting flight to Porto Alegre where FISL will take place.

Already a few years back, I heard that FISL is one of the pearls among international Free software events, and this year, fate (impersonated by the FISL organizers) invited me to speak at FISL, a wonderful opportunity. Doing bit of research, FISL is an order of magnitude bigger than European events, which due to geographical proximity are a bit more often on my agenda, so I’m quite excited to celebrate this Planet’s biggest community-driven Free software event, and I’m honoured that I will get the opportunity to present our ideas, work and progress on Freeing the Device spectrum to the audience (mark down “Friday, 27th, 11.00h, auditorium” in your agendas!).

Brazil has a special place in my heart, I’ve been working together for a few years with many awesome Brazilian hackers and contributors, I’ve had the opportunity to visit this huge country earlier (when I keynoted at OpenBossa conference in 2009 in Recife) which I’ve fond memories of. I’m glad I’m back now. (Although it’s not quite so real yet, airports are quite the same everywhere.) I’ll arrive at my hotel in Porto Alegre quite late tonight, will hopefully get a good night of sleep to counter the jetlag, and a day tomorrow to acclimatize and possibly visit the city.

On Wednesday, Daker Pinheiro and me will be running a workshop about developing apps for the device spectrum using KDE technologies. For this workshop, no prior knowledge of Qt or KDE technologies will be required, we hope to be able to get you going with the basic steps and concepts during that workshop, so that attendees get a kickstart and can continue this fun adventure when they’re back home, supported by our many online support channels (docs, email, IRC, wiki, read-the-source-luke, etc…)

The weather back home in the Netherlands has been mostly aweful, quite a crap summer indeed. Let’s see if Southern Brazilian winter beats this year’s Dutch summer…

Submerged on Koh Tao

Thursday, February 16th, 2012




Dived Japanese Garden and White Rock yesterday, after refreshing my Scuba diving skills. I’m doing that at New Heaven Diving on Koh Tao, Thailand, a smallness diving operation who do a lot of work in marine life conservancy. I really dig their regular reef cleanup efforts, and their mission to turn more diving schools into marine life conservancy agents. In the process of experiencing the fantastic underwater world, it gives a lot of background to environmental (and underlying socio-economical) problems.

Among yesterday’s highlights were a blue-spotted stingray, porcupine fish, trigger fish, various scorpionfish and thousands of other cute and sometimes curious sea creatures.

I’ve also started using my underwater camera with so far very promising results. I need to work a bit on handling of the cam, but over the course of today’s photos, I am quite thrilled of the results after about just one hour of diving with it. As I didn’t bring my laptop or tablet, uploading those will have to wait until I’m back home in early March — until then some impressions from my phone camera will have to suffice.

Tokamak 5 Photo Blog

Thursday, May 5th, 2011

Tokamak 5 has ended, the house is mostly clean and proper again, so time to post some photographic evidence of what has been an epic sprint.

Tulips, typical for the Netherlands. Not all of them made the end of the sprint.

Tulips, typical for the Netherlands. Not all of them made the end of the sprint.

Artur, looking into QtWebkit performance on Plasma Active

Artur, looking into QtWebkit performance on Plasma Active.

Dario and Ivan

BBQ, yes, that's a Brazilian taking care of the veggie grill.

BBQ, yes, that’s a Brazilian taking care of the veggie grill. (The tricolore shirt is for easier Visa procedures.)

Kevin, API bitch and Kanban master.

Kevin, API bitch (his words) and Kanban master.

Daily stand-up to catch up with other's activities.

Daily stand-up meeting to catch up with others’ activities.

No comment. (XKCD reference welcome.)

No comment. (XKCD reference welcome.)

We know what to do with ... pancakes.

We know what to do with … pancakes. (Don’t worry, Aaron and the pancake had a wonderful rest of the evening. Pancakes were kindly made by Adriaan.)

Groupphoto. Taken one day after Dario and Ruphy left, so we don't look like an Italian-only team.

Groupphoto. Taken one day after Dario and Ruphy had to leave, so we don’t look like an Italian-only team. Also clearly a Thursday.

Primary means of transportation. Looks more stupid in wide-angle.

Primary means of transportation. Looks more stupid in wide-angle.

OranjePop, one of the concerts.

OranjePop, one of the concerts. Verdict: Can’t really sing, but surely fun music to listen and watch.

we are out of househacking & KDE e.V. Board Meeting in Nijmegen

Sunday, November 14th, 2010

I’ve just returned from our local microbrewery, Brouwerij de Hemel in Nijmegen, the Netherlands, the place where I live after a nice dinner with my fellow KDE e.V. Board Member members. Friday and Saturday we had planned to hold a two+ day board meeting here in Nijmegen. Kim and me have moved into our new house in Nijmegen two weeks ago and we’re now mostly settled, meaning all critical parts of infrastructure work and are in place, and we can pick up our lives again, after two months of updating, maintaining and facelifting it from the inside. We’re now fully settled. We’ve moved inside Nijmegen from a rather nice flat into a larger house. We got the keys to the new house two months ago, and have spent this year’s september and october on painting, wallpapering, insulating and other facelift and maintainance work. Luckily, many of our friends and families came by to help us here and there. The whole process went pretty well overall, and we stayed inside our budget aswell with a result that’s really a nice improvement in terms of quality of life at home. Part of the renovation work in the new house was upgrading the attic, which was mostly used as storage space to a modern relaxed working environment. As I work from home, effectively I’ve moved office and home at the same time. The attic is now nothing short of a humongous home office, housing my large corner-desk with the dual-screen workstation I use for daily work at home, a sofa, "relatively neatly" organized cables (we all hate this mess, don’t we?!), a cool new TV with internet and UPnP snazziness, hifi system hooked up to computer and TV, a nice couch, air-conditioning, large windows, WII, etc. The roof got a 8cm insulation layer as well, so the house is much less of a climate waster now that we applied some TLC (blood, sweat, no tears) to it. One the one hand I feel like the small boy again being all happy and impressed by all the new toys, but on the other hand I’m already experiencing in my first two weeks of work in the new office that it’s exactly what tickles me to be productive and relaxed at the same time — I love it when a plan comes together.

One of the factors I’ve considered for the new office is the lighting. I’ve chosen three differently placed sources of light: 4 built-in spots above the desk, three spots under the rooltop, and two small diffuse table lamps in the lower corners. They’re separately dimmable using a small remote control, so it’s easy to adjust the lighting in the room conveniently from either desk, or couch. I’ve used halogen lamps for all lamps, after playing around with different options. There are energy-saving lamps, even the supposedly dimmable ones don’t work really well when combined in different settings. I’ve tried three different products from different vendors, and they were all not working well, meaning flickering, inconsistent switching, delays in lighting up. Even the more expensive ones (supposedly dimmable) are basically unreliable and annoying. In our bed room, I’ve installed LED lamps in a 3-spot lamp. The first set of LED lamps I’ve tried for it worked well (no dimmer involved), but the light was abit on the "cold" side. It looked a bit too slick for a bed room. I’ve replaced the lamps with similar lamps in 2700Kelvin (the ‘colder’ ones were 3000Kelvin) and the light is certainly comparable to Halogen light. The downside here is that the lamps are really expensive (~40€ a piece). They’re supposedly dimmable, but I haven’t tried that yet. The halogen light that I ended up installing in most places (either as lightbulb with inner halogen lamp, or as spots) gives the perfect, most stable and well-toned light, and dimms perfectly with very low thresholds on the dark side and really bright light when turned up. Halogen lamps are comparably inexpensive, but they not exactly energy-effective (only save about 30% compared to traditional lightbulbs, whereas you can easily save 70% by using LED lamps. The trade-off will likely go towards LED lighting in the near future, as the technology matures, R&D costs are being earnt back and economies of scale make LED lamps more affordable.

In the preliminary end (last monday-ish) the house was ready for its quite unusual inception and first stress-test: KDE e.V.’s fall board meeting.

KDE e.V. Board Meeting

Celeste Lyn Paul arrived on Thursday morning from Washington DC, Adriaan de Groot (fellow Nijmegenaar and e.V. vice president, Frank Karlitschek and Claudia Rauch, KDE e.V.’s business manager attended respectively spoke at the Netherland’s UNIX User Group’s semi-annually conference. After letting Celeste in and quickly showing her where she can find what she needs (quite easy: shower, place to take a nap, possibly food / coffee, etc.) I headed out to a meeting at the NLUUG conference in Ede where we looked into funding opportunities for KDE developers. Interesting stuff, of which I hope we can materialize some in the coming months. After getting back to Nijmegen, Celeste and me picked up Cornelius who arrived at the train station, and we went for dinner in the oldest bar in Nijmegen, De Blaauwe Hand. Tapas-style food and some bok beer really kicked off the board meeting. The weather solidly sucked with rain and wind, which is very expectable on the one hand and provides big grins on the other hand when explaining that trains are delayed because the wet rails are slippery (seriously, wtf).

The next morning, after a rather "warm" welcome the night before, we started planning the meeting. Usually, we prepare the agenda before the meeting, this time we decided to be a bit flexible there and decide about the agenda at the beginning of the meeting. I don’t think it made a big difference in the end, so in the future I’d probably lean towards prep’ing the agenda before the meeting on the mailing list, to save some valuable face-time for less administrative tasks. The board meeting was otherwise pretty productive. It struck me that the load of administrivia to deal with was rather bearable, which reflects well on the work we’ve done over the past years consolidating our operations. "Consolidating our operations" of course means "Claudia and her team in the Berlin office (currently Agata and Jenny, previously Torsten) take board member’s headache away. :-)

The fact that the KDE e.V. is a well-working, stable and effective organisation is quite convenient as it allows us to be more out-going, and more "enabling" as an organisation. While we have increased our investments in things like developer sprints, Akademy, travel support for KDE developers, promotion and many other organisational things, we have also been able to increase the income alongside: both sides of the balance are in healthy ratio. As we’ve planned quite conservatively financially over the past year, we even have some financial space to tackle bigger ideas. One idea of Cornelius I really liked, but it’s just too awesome to share at this pristine point, so I’d rather disappoint my readers here. Stay tuned, anyway. :P

I’m really proud to have contributed in this rather special way, by hosting my fellow board members here. We’ve had lots of good meeting hours, but also some very valuable face-time. Kim was rather helpful in the background, so that’s where the credit for the host should really go. So much for Nijmegen. Tomorrow, Frank and I will be doing some hacking here, and then flying off to Dublin for the MeeGo conference. In short: after having taken some more time for personal stuff, I’m back in full swing. Arrrrr.


Thursday, October 28th, 2010

Just a quick shout-out, K, me and the pets (and computers) are moving into the new house now, which means I’ll be hard to reach over the next couple of days. I should be fully moved into my new home office on Monday. Progress can be monitored here.

See you on the flip side. :-)