Plasma Components on Android: Accelerating Subsurface Mobile Development

Marco has come over to the Netherlands to pay me a visit, and to hack a little bit together, in person. So with the weather clearly suggesting to stay inside, that’s what we did over the weekend, and how better to entertain yourself than to work on mobile software?

Marco has been working for a while on components that follow Plasma’s human interface guidelines and make it easy to implement applications with a common navigation pattern and look and feel. Obviously, these components use a lot of Plasma under the hood, so they get excellent integration at a visual and at a technical level. This high integration, however, comes at the price of having a non-trivial chain of dependencies. That’s not a problem in Plasma Mobile, or other Plasma workspaces, since all that is already there, anyway.
We thought that an interesting exercise would be to find out what really defines a “Plasma application”, and how we can make the concepts we engrained in their design available to application developers more easily. How hard could it be to use Plasma components in an Android app, for example? The answer is, not entirely trivial, but it just became a whole lot easier. So what did we do?

For those reading this article via a feed aggregator, hop over to youtube to watch the demo video.
We took Subsurface, which is a piece of Free software used for logging and analysing scuba dives. Subsurface has a mobile version, which is still in its infancy, so it’s an excellent candidate to experiment with. We also took Marco’s set of Plasma components that provide a reduced set of functionality, in fact, just enough to create what most applications will need. These components extend QtQuick components where we found them lacking. They’re very light weight, carry no dependencies other than QtQuick, and they’re entirely written in QML, so basically, you add a bunch of QML files to your app and concentrate on what makes your app great, not on overall navigation components or re-implementing for the n-th time a set of widgets.

So after solving some deployment issues, on Saturday night, we had the Plasma mobile components loading in an Android app. A first success. Running the app did show a number of problems, however, so we spent most of the Sunday to look into each problem one by one and trying to solve them. By early Monday morning, we had all of the glaring issues we found during our testing solved, and we got Subsurface mobile to a pretty solid appearance (pretty solid given its early state of development, not bug free by any means).

So, what to take a away from this? In a reduced form, Plasma can be a huge help to create also Android applications. The mobile components which we’re developing with Plasma Mobile as target in mind have had their first real world exposure and a lot of fixes, we got very useful feedback from the Subsurface community which we’re directly feeding back into our components.

A big thanks goes out to the Subsurface team and especially Dirk Hohndel for giving us excellent and timely feedback, for being open to our ideas and for willing to play guinea pig for the Plasma HIG and our components. The state you can see in the above video has already been reviewed and merged into Subsurface’s master tree, so divers around the world will be able to enjoy it when the app becomes available for a wider audience.

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